Citation

Critical Thinking Skills: Finding Compelling Ways to Teach Students to Think Analytically and Systematically in Political Science

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Get this Document | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

Getting students to memorize facts is easy. Getting students to think through politically contentious issues in an analytical, systematic way is not. Yet while most political science professors prefer the second outcome, more often than we’d like, we end up settling for the first.

This presentation is about finding compelling ways to engage students on critical thinking skills. I focus on two main issues: selection and presentation of materials. First, how do you narrow your choice of what critical thinking skills you will ask students to master? The topic could cover an entire semester, but most of us can only spare a week on the syllabus. I argue that by carefully selecting core aspects of critical thinking, which build on one another, you can arm students with a fair spread of analytical tools.

Second, how do you present the material in a way that doesn’t leave students yawning? The term “critical thinking skills” is overused to the point of being meaningless for students; how do you re-infuse it with meaning? I use a two-track strategy. First, I give students examples that are immediately relevant to them, regardless of career field. When I illustrate that better critical thinking skills help them argue more persuasively, students engage more fully. Second, I give students many exercises and problems to help them work through the issues, so that a task such as understanding causation becomes second nature.

My goal as a professor is for my students to value the product of critical thinking so highly that they will even question their own long-held assumptions. I look forward to feedback from my colleagues to help me refine or rethink my approach, to help take me further on that quest.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

variabl (85), hypothesi (40), caus (36), independ (35), depend (34), student (27), suffici (24), think (23), necessari (22), countri (21), effect (20), spurious (20), vote (20), present (19), point (19), creat (19), causal (18), critic (18), hypothes (17), identifi (17), relationship (17),

Author's Keywords:

critical thinking skills
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: APSA Teaching and Learning Conference
URL:
http://www.apsanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p11511_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Rublee, Maria Rost. "Critical Thinking Skills: Finding Compelling Ways to Teach Students to Think Analytically and Systematically in Political Science" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Teaching and Learning Conference, <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p11511_index.html>

APA Citation:

Rublee, M. "Critical Thinking Skills: Finding Compelling Ways to Teach Students to Think Analytically and Systematically in Political Science" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Teaching and Learning Conference Online <PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p11511_index.html

Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: Getting students to memorize facts is easy. Getting students to think through politically contentious issues in an analytical, systematic way is not. Yet while most political science professors prefer the second outcome, more often than we’d like, we end up settling for the first.

This presentation is about finding compelling ways to engage students on critical thinking skills. I focus on two main issues: selection and presentation of materials. First, how do you narrow your choice of what critical thinking skills you will ask students to master? The topic could cover an entire semester, but most of us can only spare a week on the syllabus. I argue that by carefully selecting core aspects of critical thinking, which build on one another, you can arm students with a fair spread of analytical tools.

Second, how do you present the material in a way that doesn’t leave students yawning? The term “critical thinking skills” is overused to the point of being meaningless for students; how do you re-infuse it with meaning? I use a two-track strategy. First, I give students examples that are immediately relevant to them, regardless of career field. When I illustrate that better critical thinking skills help them argue more persuasively, students engage more fully. Second, I give students many exercises and problems to help them work through the issues, so that a task such as understanding causation becomes second nature.

My goal as a professor is for my students to value the product of critical thinking so highly that they will even question their own long-held assumptions. I look forward to feedback from my colleagues to help me refine or rethink my approach, to help take me further on that quest.

Get this Document:

Find this citation or document at one or all of these locations below. The links below may have the citation or the entire document for free or you may purchase access to the document. Clicking on these links will change the site you're on and empty your shopping cart.

Abstract Only All Academic Inc.
Associated Document Available Political Research Online

Document Type: PDF
Page count: 19
Word count: 4173
Text sample:
Critical Thinking: Teaching Students to Think Analytically and Systematically about Political Science Dr. Maria Rost Rublee Assistant Professor Government and World Affairs University of Tampa I. Abstract Getting students to memorize facts is easy. Getting students to think through politically contentious issues in an analytical systematic way is not. Yet while most political science professors prefer the second outcome more often than we’d like we end up settling for the first. This presentation is about finding compelling ways to
in which two or more variables change together Fill in the blanks. (1 point per blank) 1. When testing a hypothesis you need to look for evidence that _______________ the hypothesis as well as evidence that ______________ the hypothesis. 2. Reciprocal causation is defined as when variable A _______________ variable B and variable B ______________ variable A. Extra Credit What is a hypothesis? (1 point) Think about a belief that you hold strongly regarding politics. Phrase it as a


Similar Titles:
Cause and Effect: Critical Reading and Causal Analysis

Causal Effects of Internet: Does Internet Cause Voting and Political Participation other than Voting?

Sociomathematical norms in Lebanese classrooms and their relationship to higher order critical thinking in students: Some different conceptual starting points for mathematics teaching and learning


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.