Citation

Gender Differences in Mood Management and Mood Adjustment

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Get this Document | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

Mood management theory (Zillmann, 1988) has found ample empirical support but was also challenged by gender differences and exposure to negative content. These challenges are addressed while applying response style theory (Nolen-Hoeksema, 1990) and the mood adjustment approach (Knobloch, 2003) to media selection phenomena. Hypotheses are tested with a re-analysis of a mood management experiment and original data from a mood adjustment experiment. Gender-split selection patterns were only expected for mediocre and negative moods but did apply regardless of mood valence. Right after an emotional experience, men tend to distract themselves with absorbing media stimuli, whereas women tend to ruminate the experience and thus prefer media message with low absorption potential. When anticipating an emotionally relevant activity, men tend to distract themselves right before it by selecting absorbing content, while women focus on it and thus prefer less absorbing messages.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

mood (237), gender (104), music (64), women (60), studi (59), differ (58), exposur (57), men (57), media (53), select (51), distract (48), manag (45), p (42), emot (41), time (40), zillmann (39), rumin (38), effect (36), 1 (34), joy (34), hoeksema (34),

Author's Keywords:

mood management, mood adjustment, response style, gender differences, selective exposure
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: International Communication Association
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p11665_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Knobloch, Silvia. "Gender Differences in Mood Management and Mood Adjustment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, <Not Available>. 2009-05-25 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p11665_index.html>

APA Citation:

Knobloch, S. "Gender Differences in Mood Management and Mood Adjustment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2009-05-25 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p11665_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Mood management theory (Zillmann, 1988) has found ample empirical support but was also challenged by gender differences and exposure to negative content. These challenges are addressed while applying response style theory (Nolen-Hoeksema, 1990) and the mood adjustment approach (Knobloch, 2003) to media selection phenomena. Hypotheses are tested with a re-analysis of a mood management experiment and original data from a mood adjustment experiment. Gender-split selection patterns were only expected for mediocre and negative moods but did apply regardless of mood valence. Right after an emotional experience, men tend to distract themselves with absorbing media stimuli, whereas women tend to ruminate the experience and thus prefer media message with low absorption potential. When anticipating an emotionally relevant activity, men tend to distract themselves right before it by selecting absorbing content, while women focus on it and thus prefer less absorbing messages.

Get this Document:

Find this citation or document at one or all of these locations below. The links below may have the citation or the entire document for free or you may purchase access to the document. Clicking on these links will change the site you're on and empty your shopping cart.

Associated Document Available Access Fee All Academic Inc.

Document Type: application/pdf
Page count: 32
Word count: 8956
Text sample:
RUNNING HEAD: Gender & Mood Gender Differences in Mood Management and Mood Adjustment Gender Differences in Mood Management and Mood Adjustment Abstract Mood management theory (Zillmann 1988) has found ample empirical support but was also challenged by gender differences and exposure to negative content. These challenges are addressed while applying response style theory (Nolen-Hoeksema 1990) and the mood adjustment approach (Knobloch 2003) to media selection phenomena. Hypotheses are tested with a re-analysis of a mood management experiment and original
Females 36 34 32 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Music Listening Period (1-min intervals) Figure 3: Selective Exposure to Energetic-Joyful Music after a Mood Induction While Anticipating Further Tasks as a Function of Gender and Time 32


Similar Titles:
The Right Mood vs. the Best Mood: Being Strategic About Selective Media Exposure

Who are the women? Where are the women? And what difference can they make? The effects of gender parity in French municipal elections.

Temporal Changes in Mood Repair Through Music Consumption: Effects of Mood, Mood Salience, and Individual Differences


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.