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A Comparison of Five Social Psychological Models of Condom Use: Implications for Designing Prevention Messages
Unformatted Document Text:  A Comparison of Five Social Psychological Models of Condom Use 3 Perro& Mannetti, 1997; Sheeran et al., 1999). Particularly for adolescents’ condom use, knowledge was not a powerful determinant. Even when individuals possessed HIV prevention knowledge, they did not act accordingly (Colon et al., 2000; Hardeman et al., 1997). Perceived benefits of condom use were shown to predict intention to use condoms of young adults (Hardeman et al, 1997), as was self-efficacy (Colon et al., 2000). Significantly, young populations’ control perceptions that could be either self-efficacy or perceived behavioral control, as well as social norms influenced condom use (Albarracin, Kumkale & Johnson, 2004). Given that the psychological predictors of condom-use intentions and behaviors are exceptionally varied and young people remain at risk to HIV as well as other STDs, the current study attempts to investigate how intentions to use condoms and condom-use behaviors are independently determined by different sets of predictors. Five Social Psychological Models to Predicting Condom Use A vast number of psychological theories of the human’s decision making process have been applied to investigate condom use among young populations (Albarracin et al., 2004; Bandawe & Foster, 1996; Beckman & Harvey, 1996; Bosompra, 2001; Colon, et al., 2000; Hardeman et al., 1997; Sheeran et al., 1999; Trafimow, 2001). Among several social psychological approaches, we spotlight only five promising theoretical models to investigate condom use intentions and behaviors, namely the theory of reasoned action; the theory of planned behavior; the self-efficacy theory; the health belief model; and the information-motivation-behavioral skills model. Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) The theory of reasoned action (TRA) is the psychological theory most frequently employed to study health behaviors (Noar & Zimmerman, in press), including condom use.

Authors: Chaisamrej, Rungrat., Zimmerman, Rick., Noar, Seth. and Thomas, Lucas.
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A Comparison of Five Social Psychological Models of Condom Use
3
Perro& Mannetti, 1997; Sheeran et al., 1999). Particularly for adolescents’ condom use,
knowledge was not a powerful determinant. Even when individuals possessed HIV
prevention knowledge, they did not act accordingly (Colon et al., 2000; Hardeman et al.,
1997). Perceived benefits of condom use were shown to predict intention to use condoms
of young adults (Hardeman et al, 1997), as was self-efficacy (Colon et al., 2000).
Significantly, young populations’ control perceptions that could be either self-efficacy or
perceived behavioral control, as well as social norms influenced condom use (Albarracin,
Kumkale & Johnson, 2004).
Given that the psychological predictors of condom-use intentions and behaviors are
exceptionally varied and young people remain at risk to HIV as well as other STDs, the
current study attempts to investigate how intentions to use condoms and condom-use
behaviors are independently determined by different sets of predictors.
Five Social Psychological Models to Predicting Condom Use
A vast number of psychological theories of the human’s decision making process
have been applied to investigate condom use among young populations (Albarracin et al.,
2004; Bandawe & Foster, 1996; Beckman & Harvey, 1996; Bosompra, 2001; Colon, et al.,
2000; Hardeman et al., 1997; Sheeran et al., 1999; Trafimow, 2001). Among several social
psychological approaches, we spotlight only five promising theoretical models to
investigate condom use intentions and behaviors, namely the theory of reasoned action; the
theory of planned behavior; the self-efficacy theory; the health belief model; and the
information-motivation-behavioral skills model.
Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA)
The theory of reasoned action (TRA) is the psychological theory most frequently
employed to study health behaviors (Noar & Zimmerman, in press), including condom use.


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