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Superior-Subordinate Dialogue Among African American, Caucasian American, and Latino/a American Subordinates: Benefits of Being Buddies with the Boss

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Abstract:

This study presented one of the salient themes which emerged from the lived experiences of the women and men during their reflections, as subordinates, on their dialogue with their supervisors. The findings indicated that the subordinates in this study categorized their relationships with their supervisors as friendships, non-friendships/professionals, or family. Subordinates who reported being friends with their bosses, most often Caucasian Americans, seemed also to indicate having more rewarding superior-subordinate interactions. These relationships with their bosses opened other doors for them in there respective companies. Subordinates seeking or being afforded only non-friend/professional relationships with their bosses seemed to enjoy fewer professional favors or privileges than their counterparts. African American women, more so than other groups, tended to reveal having only professional relationships with their supervisors. Additionally, Latino/a American subordinates often had friendships with their bosses but many maintained that the likelihood or the quality of these friendships varied across races. The subordinates in this study who reported to family members were Caucasian American, and they appeared to have more genuine and personal dialogue with their supervisors than other groups.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

american (138), communic (110), research (100), subordin (98), p (84), boss (82), women (80), manag (75), co (66), superior (59), african (59), caucasian (56), relationship (53), may (52), gender (51), co-research (51), organiz (50), studi (50), supervisor (49), organ (49), race (46),

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Race, gender, superior-subordinate relationships
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MLA Citation:

Gates, Denise. "Superior-Subordinate Dialogue Among African American, Caucasian American, and Latino/a American Subordinates: Benefits of Being Buddies with the Boss" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, <Not Available>. 2009-05-25 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p15216_index.html>

APA Citation:

Gates, D. "Superior-Subordinate Dialogue Among African American, Caucasian American, and Latino/a American Subordinates: Benefits of Being Buddies with the Boss" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY Online <PDF>. 2009-05-25 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p15216_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study presented one of the salient themes which emerged from the lived experiences of the women and men during their reflections, as subordinates, on their dialogue with their supervisors. The findings indicated that the subordinates in this study categorized their relationships with their supervisors as friendships, non-friendships/professionals, or family. Subordinates who reported being friends with their bosses, most often Caucasian Americans, seemed also to indicate having more rewarding superior-subordinate interactions. These relationships with their bosses opened other doors for them in there respective companies. Subordinates seeking or being afforded only non-friend/professional relationships with their bosses seemed to enjoy fewer professional favors or privileges than their counterparts. African American women, more so than other groups, tended to reveal having only professional relationships with their supervisors. Additionally, Latino/a American subordinates often had friendships with their bosses but many maintained that the likelihood or the quality of these friendships varied across races. The subordinates in this study who reported to family members were Caucasian American, and they appeared to have more genuine and personal dialogue with their supervisors than other groups.

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Document Type: PDF
Page count: 45
Word count: 11069
Text sample:
Superior-Subordinate Dialogue Among African American Caucasian American and Latino/a American Subordinates: Benefits of Being Buddies with the Boss By Denise Gates Department of Communication University of Missouri-Columbia 2 Abstract This study presented one of the salient themes which emerged from the lived experiences of the women and men during their reflections as subordinates on their dialogue with their supervisors. The findings indicated that the subordinates in this study categorized their relationships with their supervisors as friendships non- friendships/professionals or
of upward maintenance tactics. Communication Monographs 58 p. 289-306. Wayne S.J. & Ferris G.R. (1990). Influence tactics affect and exchange quality in supervisor-subordinate interactions: A laboratory experiment and field study. Journal of Applied Psychology 75 p. 487-499. White Y. S. (1990). Understanding the Black woman manager’s interaction with the 45 corporate culture. The Western Journal of Black Studies 14 182-186. Yammarino F.J. Dubinsky A.J. Comer L.B. & Jolson M.A. (1997). Women and transformational and contingent reward leadership: A multiple-levels-of-analysis


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