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Movin' On Up? Residential Mobility and Locational Attainment among Black and White Immigrants in the Post-Civil Rights Era

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Abstract:

The Immigration Act of 1965 ushered in an unprecedented era of voluntary immigration from the Black/African diaspora. Since that time numerous scholars have pointed to the high socioeconomic achievements of Black immigrants relative to those of their native-born Black counterparts. However, qualitative studies have shown that it is difficult for even upwardly mobile Black immigrants to free themselves of the residential maladies that have plagued Black America. This paper uses census data to follow a Black immigration cohort in New York City over twenty years (1980-2000) to track their movement out of persistence in the typically Black American places of first settlement. Further, residential patterns of the Black second generation in New York City will be examined to see whether they are anymore likely than their immigrant parents to leave the ethnic enclave or Black ghetto. Preliminary results show that the second generation has not moved significantly from the counties there parents reside in nor have they moved in great number to White areas. Unlike Black immigrants, White immigrants seem to settle first in or near areas in which White Americans predominate and the American-born children seem not to stray far from those areas. Reasons for and ramifications of these findings are explored.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

black (68), immigr (43), white (31), generat (26), american (18), residenti (15), may (14), second (14), group (12), first (11), pattern (11), neighborhood (9), new (9), segreg (8), york (7), studi (7), blk (6), across (6), 2005 (6), assimil (6), extent (6),

Author's Keywords:

Black Americans, Immigrants, Segregation, Assimilation, White Americans, Caribbeans, Africans
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Name: American Sociological Association
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http://www.asanet.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p18849_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Emeka, Amon. "Movin' On Up? Residential Mobility and Locational Attainment among Black and White Immigrants in the Post-Civil Rights Era" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 <Not Available>. 2017-10-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p18849_index.html>

APA Citation:

Emeka, A. S. , 2005-08-12 "Movin' On Up? Residential Mobility and Locational Attainment among Black and White Immigrants in the Post-Civil Rights Era" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA Online <PDF>. 2017-10-09 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p18849_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The Immigration Act of 1965 ushered in an unprecedented era of voluntary immigration from the Black/African diaspora. Since that time numerous scholars have pointed to the high socioeconomic achievements of Black immigrants relative to those of their native-born Black counterparts. However, qualitative studies have shown that it is difficult for even upwardly mobile Black immigrants to free themselves of the residential maladies that have plagued Black America. This paper uses census data to follow a Black immigration cohort in New York City over twenty years (1980-2000) to track their movement out of persistence in the typically Black American places of first settlement. Further, residential patterns of the Black second generation in New York City will be examined to see whether they are anymore likely than their immigrant parents to leave the ethnic enclave or Black ghetto. Preliminary results show that the second generation has not moved significantly from the counties there parents reside in nor have they moved in great number to White areas. Unlike Black immigrants, White immigrants seem to settle first in or near areas in which White Americans predominate and the American-born children seem not to stray far from those areas. Reasons for and ramifications of these findings are explored.


Similar Titles:
Segregation Immigration, and Intergroup Homicides: A Multilevel Study of New York City Neighborhoods

Assimilation from What? The Origins of Immigrants and Mobility Patterns of the New Second Generation

"You're Not African:" A Comparative Study of Group Identification & Resistance Among African-American & First Generation West

Marital Assimilation and Economic Stratification among First and Second Generation Immigrants

Resisting the White Pole - A Feminist Ethnographic Study: Second-Generation South Asian-American Women, U.S. Racialization Projects, and the Arranged Marriage


 
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