Citation

Economic transition and Subjective Subjective Well-being: a Comparison between China and East Germany

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

High economic growth brings about no increase in subjective well-being (SWB) in East Germany and even a great decline in China. This paper tries to explain how economic transition impacts on happiness, by using an empirical data from World values surveys. High income group does not enjoy an increasing SWB but low income group suffers a great decline in SWB. The negative effect of unemployment is significant in East Germany and keeps insignificant in China. The effect of political capital keeps significant in China and turns insignificant in East Germany, while education has a positive association with SWB in East Germany but no important effect in China. These findings suggest that economic institutional settings determine the roles of income, unemployment, education and political privilege.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

tt (2), onsisten (1), hildren (1), conomic factor (1), reviou (1), nteractio (1), electe (1), iterature. (1), ttentio (1), howing tha (1), tatus (1), oreover (1), r separated (1), rust (1), elf-agenc (1), lso found (1), ositive effect (1), odel (1), xpected (1), ow (1), alu (1),

Author's Keywords:

subjective well-being, economic transition, income, political privilege, education
Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: American Sociological Association
URL:
http://www.asanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p21214_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Yuan, Hao. and Brockmann, Hilke. "Economic transition and Subjective Subjective Well-being: a Comparison between China and East Germany" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 <Not Available>. 2017-10-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p21214_index.html>

APA Citation:

Yuan, H. and Brockmann, H. , 2005-08-12 "Economic transition and Subjective Subjective Well-being: a Comparison between China and East Germany" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA Online <PDF>. 2017-10-09 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p21214_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: High economic growth brings about no increase in subjective well-being (SWB) in East Germany and even a great decline in China. This paper tries to explain how economic transition impacts on happiness, by using an empirical data from World values surveys. High income group does not enjoy an increasing SWB but low income group suffers a great decline in SWB. The negative effect of unemployment is significant in East Germany and keeps insignificant in China. The effect of political capital keeps significant in China and turns insignificant in East Germany, while education has a positive association with SWB in East Germany but no important effect in China. These findings suggest that economic institutional settings determine the roles of income, unemployment, education and political privilege.


Similar Titles:
Has the Implementation of the BCRA Made an Impact on the Effect of Campaign Spending in Congressional Elections? Evidence from the 2002 and the 2004 Election

The Effect of Presidential Campaigning in Midterm Elections: The 2002 and 2006 Midterm Senate Elections

The Clinton Factor: The Effect of Clinton's Personal Image in 2000 Presidential Primaries and in the General Election


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.