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The Importance of Space: Environmental Inequality in Post-Industrial Detroit, Michigan and Portland, Oregon

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Abstract:

Abstract. The research presented here directly engages the issues of environmental inequality within an historical context. The research provides an accounting of landfill sites and Superfund sites during the post-industrial years in Portland, Oregon and Detroit, Michigan. The starting point for this research is a rare set of archival “redlining” maps produced between 1935 and 1940 by the Home Owner’s Loan Corporation (HOLC). Multiple points of data, much of it collected through archival research, when combined together, form the basis for an investigation of how race, class, and wealth have differential impacts upon landfill and Superfund siting. In addition to a longitudinal understanding of how environmental inequality this research provides a test of three prominent social inequality explanations with respect to their contribution to our understanding of environmental inequality comprises the main thrust of this project.
The results (as displayed through geographic information system maps (GIS)) indicate that the probability of living near a landfill is highest among the economically deprived, while the likelihood of living near a Superfund site is highest among the economically disadvantaged and African-Americans. These findings point to a multi-faceted understanding of social and environmental inequality in which space is an important component.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

environment (96), inequ (90), segreg (60), econom (59), site (58), american (53), race (48), landfil (40), african (39), african-american (38), superfund (38), class (37), wealth (36), wilson (35), indic (33), depriv (31), urban (30), import (30), hous (29), racial (28), facil (26),

Author's Keywords:

Environmental Inequality, Urban Environmental Inequality, Spatial Inequality
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Name: American Sociological Association
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MLA Citation:

Smith, Chad. "The Importance of Space: Environmental Inequality in Post-Industrial Detroit, Michigan and Portland, Oregon" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 <Not Available>. 2017-10-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p21919_index.html>

APA Citation:

Smith, C. L. , 2005-08-12 "The Importance of Space: Environmental Inequality in Post-Industrial Detroit, Michigan and Portland, Oregon" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA Online <PDF>. 2017-10-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p21919_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Abstract. The research presented here directly engages the issues of environmental inequality within an historical context. The research provides an accounting of landfill sites and Superfund sites during the post-industrial years in Portland, Oregon and Detroit, Michigan. The starting point for this research is a rare set of archival “redlining” maps produced between 1935 and 1940 by the Home Owner’s Loan Corporation (HOLC). Multiple points of data, much of it collected through archival research, when combined together, form the basis for an investigation of how race, class, and wealth have differential impacts upon landfill and Superfund siting. In addition to a longitudinal understanding of how environmental inequality this research provides a test of three prominent social inequality explanations with respect to their contribution to our understanding of environmental inequality comprises the main thrust of this project.
The results (as displayed through geographic information system maps (GIS)) indicate that the probability of living near a landfill is highest among the economically deprived, while the likelihood of living near a Superfund site is highest among the economically disadvantaged and African-Americans. These findings point to a multi-faceted understanding of social and environmental inequality in which space is an important component.


Similar Titles:
Race, Citizenship and Movement: The Restrictive Nature of Federal Housing Law on the Geographic Mobility of African-Americans in Urban Areas

Get Up & Get Out: How Race and Class Influence African Americans' Attitudes about Inequality


 
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