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The life course and family experiences of women in the military

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Abstract:

The military is an institution that makes unique demands on its personnel in terms of time and energy, but also sometimes requires the ultimate sacrifice of life or limb. Prior to the All-Volunteer Force, these demands were faced mostly by single male recruits. Married personnel faced the same demands, but they were much smaller in number. Since women were a small part of the military and they were not allowed in operational or deployable billets, it was little different than working in the private sector. However, until 1977, when a woman had a family, she was discharged as unsuitable for further military service. Although this policy has changed, attitudes and policies that might make it easier for a military woman to have a family have been slow in coming. As a result, women in the military are less likely to marry and have a family than their male peers. For example, as of 2002 in the highest flag and general officer ranks, women are more likely to be single (36.4%) than men (2.8%), while only 21.2% of women had children as compared to 58.6% of men. Although this is similar to what women face in the private sector, there are advocates who claim this is unfair and discriminatory to women. This paper explores the various advantages and disadvantages, and decisions that women in the military must make vis-à-vis the life course.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

militari (107), women (96), famili (76), marri (43), may (41), also (37), work (36), member (35), offic (33), children (32), enlist (29), singl (25), 2000 (24), segal (24), men (23), cite (22), author (22), requir (22), darlen (21), issu (21), draft (21),

Author's Keywords:

military women, military family, military policy, work and family balance, life course
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Name: American Sociological Association
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http://www.asanet.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p22602_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Iskra, Darlene. "The life course and family experiences of women in the military" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 <Not Available>. 2017-10-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p22602_index.html>

APA Citation:

Iskra, D. M. , 2005-08-12 "The life course and family experiences of women in the military" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA Online <PDF>. 2017-10-09 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p22602_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The military is an institution that makes unique demands on its personnel in terms of time and energy, but also sometimes requires the ultimate sacrifice of life or limb. Prior to the All-Volunteer Force, these demands were faced mostly by single male recruits. Married personnel faced the same demands, but they were much smaller in number. Since women were a small part of the military and they were not allowed in operational or deployable billets, it was little different than working in the private sector. However, until 1977, when a woman had a family, she was discharged as unsuitable for further military service. Although this policy has changed, attitudes and policies that might make it easier for a military woman to have a family have been slow in coming. As a result, women in the military are less likely to marry and have a family than their male peers. For example, as of 2002 in the highest flag and general officer ranks, women are more likely to be single (36.4%) than men (2.8%), while only 21.2% of women had children as compared to 58.6% of men. Although this is similar to what women face in the private sector, there are advocates who claim this is unfair and discriminatory to women. This paper explores the various advantages and disadvantages, and decisions that women in the military must make vis-à-vis the life course.


Similar Titles:
WORK AND FAMILY EXPECTATIONS OF MILITARY WOMEN LEADERS

Managing Wage Work and Care Work for Children with Disabilities: how single- and two-parent white and Latino families juggle competing demands

MILITARY WOMEN LEADING CHANGE IN FAMILY AND WORK


 
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