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Tri-State 10-Year Study of Juvenile Transfers: A Serious Threat to Juvenile Offenders?

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Abstract:

An analysis of a recent 10-year trend in juvenile waiver, transfer, or certification hearings in Florida, North Carolina, and Tennessee shows that waivers have stabilized and that less than 1 percent of all juveniles who move beyond the intake stage are ever charged as adults. A common belief is that waivers of juveniles to criminal court is a deterrent to further juvenile offending. However, for the jurisdictions examined here, waivers fall far short of achieving this just-deserts objective. During the 1990-1999 period, the majority of juveniles waived in the jurisdictions studied were largely property or drug offenders. Only about 39 percent of those transferred were violent offenders. Furthermore, only about 7 percent of those transferred subsequently served time in correctional facilities. Approximately 48 percent of those transferred either had their cases dismissed or the charges were downgraded to less serious misdemeanors and diversion or probation was imposed. The result of waivers in these jurisdictions is that the most serious offenders in the juvenile justice system are not targeted for criminal court transfers. When these juveniles reach criminal courts for processing, they have over a 90 percent chance of having their cases either dismissed, downgraded, or plea bargained with probationary outcomes. Thus, waivers are not necessarily accomplishing what juvenile courts intend by these actions. Policy implications of what happens to juveniles once transferred are discussed.
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Association:
Name: American Society of Criminology
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http://www.asc41.com


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p32043_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Champion, Dean. "Tri-State 10-Year Study of Juvenile Transfers: A Serious Threat to Juvenile Offenders?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, <Not Available>. 2013-12-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p32043_index.html>

APA Citation:

Champion, D. J. "Tri-State 10-Year Study of Juvenile Transfers: A Serious Threat to Juvenile Offenders?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto <Not Available>. 2013-12-17 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p32043_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: An analysis of a recent 10-year trend in juvenile waiver, transfer, or certification hearings in Florida, North Carolina, and Tennessee shows that waivers have stabilized and that less than 1 percent of all juveniles who move beyond the intake stage are ever charged as adults. A common belief is that waivers of juveniles to criminal court is a deterrent to further juvenile offending. However, for the jurisdictions examined here, waivers fall far short of achieving this just-deserts objective. During the 1990-1999 period, the majority of juveniles waived in the jurisdictions studied were largely property or drug offenders. Only about 39 percent of those transferred were violent offenders. Furthermore, only about 7 percent of those transferred subsequently served time in correctional facilities. Approximately 48 percent of those transferred either had their cases dismissed or the charges were downgraded to less serious misdemeanors and diversion or probation was imposed. The result of waivers in these jurisdictions is that the most serious offenders in the juvenile justice system are not targeted for criminal court transfers. When these juveniles reach criminal courts for processing, they have over a 90 percent chance of having their cases either dismissed, downgraded, or plea bargained with probationary outcomes. Thus, waivers are not necessarily accomplishing what juvenile courts intend by these actions. Policy implications of what happens to juveniles once transferred are discussed.

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