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Abuse as the Motive for Abuse Problems in the Assessment of the ‘Control Motive’

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Abstract:

Much recent attention has been brought to bear on the motive to control and its role in intimate partner violence (Felson and Messner, 2001; Johnson, 1999; Outlaw, 2001). Although arguably one of the most important risk factors for violence (Johnson, 1999; Outlaw, 2001), use of current measures of ‘coercive control’ obscures potentially important distinctions between methods of control, which in other contexts are considered types of abuse in their own right. Specifically, such measures tend to include items such as whether a current partner “limits your access to the family income,” “limits your contact with family and friends,” and/or “makes you feel inadequate” (Tjaden and Thoennes, 1998). In other works, these items can easily be understood as reflecting economic, social, and emotional abuse, respectively (Miller, 1995). Although not inaccurate to conceptualize these behaviors as also reflecting strategies of coercive control, doing so may mask important differences in their relationship(s) to violence. The current study therefore disentangles the multiple types of nonviolent abuse/control to examine the effects of each on the frequency and severity of physical violence by intimate partners. Using Tjaden and Thoennes’(1998) Violence and Threats of Violence against Women and Men in the United States, 1994-1996 survey data, each type of abuse and their combinations are examined in terms of their impact on the risks of physical violence against intimate partners. Implications for research are discussed.
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Name: American Society of Criminology
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http://www.asc41.com


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p34083_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Outlaw, Maureen. "Abuse as the Motive for Abuse Problems in the Assessment of the ‘Control Motive’" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, Nov 15, 2005 <Not Available>. 2013-12-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p34083_index.html>

APA Citation:

Outlaw, M. , 2005-11-15 "Abuse as the Motive for Abuse Problems in the Assessment of the ‘Control Motive’" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto <Not Available>. 2013-12-17 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p34083_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Much recent attention has been brought to bear on the motive to control and its role in intimate partner violence (Felson and Messner, 2001; Johnson, 1999; Outlaw, 2001). Although arguably one of the most important risk factors for violence (Johnson, 1999; Outlaw, 2001), use of current measures of ‘coercive control’ obscures potentially important distinctions between methods of control, which in other contexts are considered types of abuse in their own right. Specifically, such measures tend to include items such as whether a current partner “limits your access to the family income,” “limits your contact with family and friends,” and/or “makes you feel inadequate” (Tjaden and Thoennes, 1998). In other works, these items can easily be understood as reflecting economic, social, and emotional abuse, respectively (Miller, 1995). Although not inaccurate to conceptualize these behaviors as also reflecting strategies of coercive control, doing so may mask important differences in their relationship(s) to violence. The current study therefore disentangles the multiple types of nonviolent abuse/control to examine the effects of each on the frequency and severity of physical violence by intimate partners. Using Tjaden and Thoennes’(1998) Violence and Threats of Violence against Women and Men in the United States, 1994-1996 survey data, each type of abuse and their combinations are examined in terms of their impact on the risks of physical violence against intimate partners. Implications for research are discussed.

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