All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

From Silence to Dissent: Fostering Critical Voice in an Era of Compliance
Unformatted Document Text:  Megan: Isn’t this what it’s really about, carefully listening to and analyzing each other’s views? I mean do real teachers do this? Do they ever really get to reflect on their practice, or do just go through the motions? Ted: I know I’m only beginning my student teaching, but I don’t see this happening in my school. Is this what faculty meetings are like? Ryan: I’ve been a long-term substitute for a whole semester and I’ve never been in a faculty meeting where there was a conversation like this. And I don’t get it. Shouldn’t teachers be engaged in this kind of discussion? Isn’t this what should happen in a faculty meeting? This exchange, and many more like it, underscores the perceived importance —even urgency—of addressing the “Yes, but…” question. Listening to the taped transcripts reveals not only deep student reflection about weighty educational issues, but also important insights. Further, there is clearly an evolution in thinking unfolding here that underscores the value of engaging teachers in the kind of dialectical process advocated in the past by notable educators like Dewey and today, by a whole host of critical theorists. Giroux (1985), in particular, has noted that we need to “…rethink and restructure the nature of teacher work” (Canestrari & Marlowe, 2004, p. 209) and begin to view teachers as “transformative intellectuals.” Giroux believes that the current emphasis in teacher education programs on the “how to,” on teaching methodologies, “…appear to deny the very need for critical thinking.” Similarly, Zeichner (1983) has suggested that when prospective teachers are viewed primarily as passive recipients of professional knowledge (and in turn play “…little part in determining the substance and direction” of their own preparation) they are more likely to see their roles as teachers as simple “executors of the laws and principles of effective teaching” without thinking critically about what they have been asked to execute, its effects on their students, or even on their own well-being. Imagine, instead, how our schools might be different if in-service teachers engaged in regular discussions, like the one below between our students, about whether the mandates they face are consistent with their view of what is in the best interest of their students.Jane: But, what do we do when we are asked to do something we know isn’t right, or is contrary to what we’ve learned in some of our classes here? I just had a class in literacy where we talked about how research indicates that “Round Robin” reading is not best practice. And yet, the classroom I’m in now as a student teacher, that’s all they do. It’s the whole reading program. Maya: As a new person, as a first year teacher I wouldn’t say anything. I mean you don’t have any credibility. You’re the new kid on the block and you have to go along at first. Professor Smith: Will it be the same as a tenth year teacher? How long do you wait to do what you see as the right thing? Ted: One thing we can count on is that what’ s wrong today will be right tomorrow. School reforms come in waves. Professor Doe: So will you allow yourself to be swept in and out with the tide?

Authors: Marlowe, Bruce. and Canestrari, Alan.
first   previous   Page 4 of 12   next   last



background image
Megan: Isn’t this what it’s really about, carefully listening to and analyzing each other’s
views? I mean do real teachers do this? Do they ever really get to reflect on their
practice, or do just go through the motions?
Ted: I know I’m only beginning my student teaching, but I don’t see this happening in
my school. Is this what faculty meetings are like?
Ryan: I’ve been a long-term substitute for a whole semester and I’ve never been in a
faculty meeting where there was a conversation like this. And I don’t get it. Shouldn’t
teachers be engaged in this kind of discussion? Isn’t this what should happen in a faculty
meeting?
This exchange, and many more like it, underscores the perceived importance —even
urgency—of addressing the “Yes, but…” question. Listening to the taped transcripts
reveals not only deep student reflection about weighty educational issues, but also
important insights. Further, there is clearly an evolution in thinking unfolding here that
underscores the value of engaging teachers in the kind of dialectical process advocated in
the past by notable educators like Dewey and today, by a whole host of critical theorists.
Giroux (1985), in particular, has noted that we need to “…rethink and restructure the
nature of teacher work” (Canestrari & Marlowe, 2004, p. 209) and begin to view teachers
as “transformative intellectuals.” Giroux believes that the current emphasis in teacher
education programs on the “how to,” on teaching methodologies, “…appear to deny the
very need for critical thinking.” Similarly, Zeichner (1983) has suggested that when
prospective teachers are viewed primarily as passive recipients of professional knowledge
(and in turn play “…little part in determining the substance and direction” of their own
preparation) they are more likely to see their roles as teachers as simple “executors of the
laws and principles of effective teaching” without thinking critically about what they
have been asked to execute, its effects on their students, or even on their own well-being.
Imagine, instead, how our schools might be different if in-service teachers engaged in
regular discussions, like the one below between our students, about whether the mandates
they face are consistent with their view of what is in the best interest of their students.
Jane: But, what do we do when we are asked to do something we know isn’t right, or is
contrary to what we’ve learned in some of our classes here? I just had a class in literacy
where we talked about how research indicates that “Round Robin” reading is not best
practice. And yet, the classroom I’m in now as a student teacher, that’s all they do. It’s
the whole reading program.
Maya: As a new person, as a first year teacher I wouldn’t say anything. I mean you
don’t have any credibility. You’re the new kid on the block and you have to go along at
first.
Professor Smith: Will it be the same as a tenth year teacher? How long do you wait to
do what you see as the right thing?
Ted: One thing we can count on is that what’ s wrong today will be right tomorrow.
School reforms come in waves.
Professor Doe: So will you allow yourself to be swept in and out with the tide?


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 12   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.