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Navigating Educational Change: Creating P-12 NCLB Resource Guides
Unformatted Document Text:  NCLB: literacy, math/science, limited English proficiency, parental participation, teacher quality, safe schools, and technology. Participants in this process represent a diverse range of school populations (e.g. elementary, middle, and high schools, and urban, suburban, and rural schools and districts). The resource guides, paper and electronic, have the potential to provide information and resources on the myriad of requirements and expectations set forth by NCLB to a wide range of educational stakeholders. This work contributes to Strand I: Imagining Future Students, Future Teachers first and foremost because NCLB is a driving force in teaching and learning today for all stakeholders—students, teachers, administrators, parents, and business and community members. Therefore, it makes sense for teachers and administrators to learn as much as they can about the major components of NCLB as they relate to their particular setting, and to compile resources that can be recommended to different stakeholders that will assist them in the teaching and learning process of all students. In addition, this project provides schools and districts with tools to create resource guides based on their demographics needs. We are teaching and learning in an era of standards and accountability that is driven by NCLB. An in-depth exploration of its components, coupled with a resource guide to provide assistance in critical need areas has the potential to impact education policy and practice at the local level. This exploration also lends itself to making decisions about where to allocate funds, what data to collect, and what type of professional development is needed for educators to be successful in improving student learning, increasing school safety, enhancing technology skills, and addressing the needs of a growing diversity of students. As a result of this work, educators have become more cognizant about the individual components, their connections to one another, and a wealth of local, state, and national resources available to guide them in their quest to leave no child behind. To date, approximately 75 practicing educators have participated in this project. Many have reported sharing these guides with other teachers, their administrators, and district offices. Others have shared guides with their students’ parents. One school district posted the resource guides on their website. These guides have contributed to a better knowledge base on the realities of NCLB and they have helped to increase communication across stakeholders. SECTION II: OUTCOMES AND METHODSThe purpose of this roundtable is twofold: (1) to help participants become aware of the major components of NCLB and their implications on teaching and learning; and (2) to view and discuss P-12 resource guides created by teachers and administrators in the northern Illinois area over the past two years that inform the larger education community about the following major areas of NCLB: literacy, math/science, limited English proficiency, parental participation, teacher quality, safe schools, and technology. The intended outcomes of this session include: • Recognizing the major components of NCLB and their implications on teaching and learning; • Identifying the information needs of each educational stakeholder group and each educational context (e.g., demographics, geography, economic constraints, political climate, etc.).

Authors: Lieberman, Joyce.
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NCLB: literacy, math/science, limited English proficiency, parental participation, teacher
quality, safe schools, and technology. Participants in this process represent a diverse range of
school populations (e.g. elementary, middle, and high schools, and urban, suburban, and rural
schools and districts). The resource guides, paper and electronic, have the potential to provide
information and resources on the myriad of requirements and expectations set forth by NCLB to
a wide range of educational stakeholders.
This work contributes to Strand I: Imagining Future Students, Future Teachers first and foremost
because NCLB is a driving force in teaching and learning today for all stakeholders—students,
teachers, administrators, parents, and business and community members. Therefore, it makes
sense for teachers and administrators to learn as much as they can about the major components of
NCLB as they relate to their particular setting, and to compile resources that can be
recommended to different stakeholders that will assist them in the teaching and learning process
of all students. In addition, this project provides schools and districts with tools to create
resource guides based on their demographics needs.
We are teaching and learning in an era of standards and accountability that is driven by NCLB.
An in-depth exploration of its components, coupled with a resource guide to provide assistance
in critical need areas has the potential to impact education policy and practice at the local level.
This exploration also lends itself to making decisions about where to allocate funds, what data to
collect, and what type of professional development is needed for educators to be successful in
improving student learning, increasing school safety, enhancing technology skills, and
addressing the needs of a growing diversity of students.
As a result of this work, educators have become more cognizant about the individual
components, their connections to one another, and a wealth of local, state, and national resources
available to guide them in their quest to leave no child behind. To date, approximately 75
practicing educators have participated in this project. Many have reported sharing these guides
with other teachers, their administrators, and district offices. Others have shared guides with
their students’ parents. One school district posted the resource guides on their website. These
guides have contributed to a better knowledge base on the realities of NCLB and they have
helped to increase communication across stakeholders.
SECTION II: OUTCOMES AND METHODS
The purpose of this roundtable is twofold: (1) to help participants become aware of the major
components of NCLB and their implications on teaching and learning; and (2) to view and
discuss P-12 resource guides created by teachers and administrators in the northern Illinois area
over the past two years that inform the larger education community about the following major
areas of NCLB: literacy, math/science, limited English proficiency, parental participation,
teacher quality, safe schools, and technology.
The intended outcomes of this session include:
Recognizing the major components of NCLB and their implications on teaching and
learning;
Identifying the information needs of each educational stakeholder group and each
educational context (e.g., demographics, geography, economic constraints, political
climate, etc.).


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