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Reconfiguring Observation Roles in a Field-Placement Setting: Look Whose Watching Now!
Unformatted Document Text:  Relevance: This project relates to the Imagining Future Students, Future Teachers theme. Here, I am advocating that, for a brief yet meaningful moment in the educational hierarchy, roles are reversed. I believe that higher education must find new ways of defining old roles. Particularly, we must find ways to reduce the disconnect between the ivory tower and the K-12 classroom. Higher education must become both innovative and brave. We must become teachers-of-practice who model, in K-12 classrooms, what were preach in the college classroom. No longer can we “reflect back” upon our classroom days – we must continue to be active in K-12 classrooms. By changing the observational model from passive to active, I believe this is a concerted step towards redefining what a teacher/professor needs to be. Implication for Action: I recently spoke with a professor in North Carolina who was going to try this observational model in one of her social studies methods classes. Let’s hope that this model is catching on. Through this presentation, I hope other teacher education institutions will take this model back to their respective college campuses and advocate for a change in observational practice. This model promotes change, and change is often slow to come by in higher education. Yet I argue that if we don’t change the way we approach our faculty roles, with particular emphasis on our field placement roles, we become detached from current K-12 practice. This model can provide teacher education with a way to increase pre-service student confidence and competence while retooling the pedagogical and practical skills of the university supervisor. Section II: Outcomes and Methods Learner/Participant Outcomes: I will provide a brief overview of the observational model used in select methods courses at the University of South Carolina Aiken. I will then share examples of my experience implementing this model. Student reactions/responses will be offered as well.I will walk participants through the process of organizing the observational roles and objectives for both the university supervisor and the pre-service teacher. I will conclude by offering my insight(s) into the importance – for both student and professor – of designing such a program. Methods: Pertinent information will be displayed via PowerPoint. The nature of the session will be conversational. I wish to spur a dialogue concerning participant’s “current” model of observation and how this “future” model may work within their institution. I believe in a collaborative, discussion-based session in the spirit of shared collegiality. References Bell, C. & Robinson, N. (2004). The successful student-teaching experience: Thoughts from the ivory tower. Music Educators Journal, 91(1), 39-43.

Authors: Lintner, Tim.
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Relevance:
This project relates to the Imagining Future Students, Future Teachers theme.
Here, I am advocating that, for a brief yet meaningful moment in the educational
hierarchy, roles are reversed. I believe that higher education must find new ways of
defining old roles. Particularly, we must find ways to reduce the disconnect between the
ivory tower and the K-12 classroom. Higher education must become both innovative and
brave. We must become teachers-of-practice who model, in K-12 classrooms, what were
preach in the college classroom. No longer can we “reflect back” upon our classroom
days – we must continue to be active in K-12 classrooms. By changing the observational
model from passive to active, I believe this is a concerted step towards redefining what a
teacher/professor needs to be.
Implication for Action:
I recently spoke with a professor in North Carolina who was going to try this
observational model in one of her social studies methods classes. Let’s hope that this
model is catching on. Through this presentation, I hope other teacher education
institutions will take this model back to their respective college campuses and advocate
for a change in observational practice. This model promotes change, and change is often
slow to come by in higher education. Yet I argue that if we don’t change the way we
approach our faculty roles, with particular emphasis on our field placement roles, we
become detached from current K-12 practice. This model can provide teacher education
with a way to increase pre-service student confidence and competence while retooling the
pedagogical and practical skills of the university supervisor.
Section II: Outcomes and Methods
Learner/Participant Outcomes:
I will provide a brief overview of the observational model used in select methods
courses at the University of South Carolina Aiken. I will then share examples of my
experience implementing this model. Student reactions/responses will be offered as well.
I will walk participants through the process of organizing the observational roles and
objectives for both the university supervisor and the pre-service teacher. I will conclude
by offering my insight(s) into the importance – for both student and professor – of
designing such a program.
Methods:
Pertinent information will be displayed via PowerPoint. The nature of the session
will be conversational. I wish to spur a dialogue concerning participant’s “current”
model of observation and how this “future” model may work within their institution. I
believe in a collaborative, discussion-based session in the spirit of shared collegiality.
References
Bell, C. & Robinson, N. (2004). The successful student-teaching experience: Thoughts
from the ivory tower. Music Educators Journal, 91(1), 39-43.


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