All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Did We Get What We Wanted? Are Ohio’s Alternate Licensed Teachers Filling the Demographic and Subject Matter Demands of School Districts?
Unformatted Document Text:  2000, Ohio state legislators, through the Ohio State Department of Education, issued “Alternative Entry License (AEL)”, in which individuals who held bachelors’ degrees from accredited colleges could meet these supply needs. The Ohio Supply and Demand reports predicted the need for teachers in special education, math, and science. In addition, it was predicted these teachers would be needed in our urban and rural districts with low socioeconomic populations (Ohio Department of Education, 2003; 2004). Over the last two years, a group of researchers from every college and university, with a teacher preparation program, in Ohio initiated The Teacher Quality Partnership (TQP). Currently, in conjunction with school districts in the state a research agenda has been developed that will enable the determination of how Ohio’s Higher Education Teacher Education programs and Alternative Entry Licensed teachers can assure effective teachers who advance student growth and achievement. The TQP has a comprehensive, longitudinal study of how the preparation and development of new teachers (no matter what the program) affect their success in the classroom as measured by the academic performance of their students. As part of this initiative, Alternatively Entry Licensed teachers are being brought into examination, as to the effect of their teacher preparation on students’ achievement.3. Contribution: By investigating whether Ohio’s Alternate Entry License teachers are the filling both the demographic and subject matter demands of the state, it is possible to determine which components of the AEL teacher process needs to be altered or improved. The study provides an indicator from which supply and demand decisions can be more accurately made.Based upon the results of this study, a Policy Brief can be presented to Ohio legislators that could bring the awareness of the success and shortcomings of Ohio’s Alternative Entry License initiative. 4. Relevance The data base employed in this study covered the 507 AEL teachers in Ohio from January 2000 through June, 2004. Chi Square tests (goodness of fit) determined if there were any statistical relationships between AEL teachers placement and content area expertise, relevant to demand areas throughout the state. Initial Chi Square tests found that 48% of AEL intervention specialist teachers were not working in low SES, urban areas. In addition, it was recognized that approximately 30% of all AEL teachers were not teaching in the high demand fields of intervention specials, math or science. 5. Implication for Action An examination of the AEL route to solve supply and demand issues in education needs to be examined as to its efficacy. Educational resources are dwindling and it is essential that the supply and demand issues surrounding alternative routes to teaching be addressed. How it can be assured that all of the resources placed into alternative teachers are effectively and efficiently being used to assist our students’ growth and achievement? 2

Authors: Wahrman, Judith., Lee, Corey., West, Mary., Gilbertson, Stephanie. and Zigler, Ted.
first   previous   Page 2 of 4   next   last



background image
2000, Ohio state legislators, through the Ohio State Department of Education, issued
“Alternative Entry License (AEL)”, in which individuals who held bachelors’ degrees
from accredited colleges could meet these supply needs. The Ohio Supply and Demand
reports predicted the need for teachers in special education, math, and science. In
addition, it was predicted these teachers would be needed in our urban and rural districts
with low socioeconomic populations (Ohio Department of Education, 2003; 2004).
Over the last two years, a group of researchers from every college and university,
with a teacher preparation program, in Ohio initiated The Teacher Quality Partnership
(TQP). Currently, in conjunction with school districts in the state a research agenda has
been developed that will enable the determination of how Ohio’s Higher Education
Teacher Education programs and Alternative Entry Licensed teachers can assure effective
teachers who advance student growth and achievement. The TQP has a comprehensive,
longitudinal study of how the preparation and development of new teachers (no matter
what the program) affect their success in the classroom as measured by the academic
performance of their students. As part of this initiative, Alternatively Entry Licensed
teachers are being brought into examination, as to the effect of their teacher preparation
on students’ achievement.
3.
Contribution:
By investigating whether Ohio’s Alternate Entry License teachers are the filling both the
demographic and subject matter demands of the state, it is possible to determine which
components of the AEL teacher process needs to be altered or improved. The study
provides an indicator from which supply and demand decisions can be more accurately
made.
Based upon the results of this study, a Policy Brief can be presented to Ohio legislators
that could bring the awareness of the success and shortcomings of Ohio’s Alternative
Entry License initiative.
4.
Relevance
The data base employed in this study covered the 507 AEL teachers in Ohio from
January 2000 through June, 2004. Chi Square tests (goodness of fit) determined if there
were any statistical relationships between AEL teachers placement and content area
expertise, relevant to demand areas throughout the state. Initial Chi Square tests found
that 48% of AEL intervention specialist teachers were not working in low SES, urban
areas. In addition, it was recognized that approximately 30% of all AEL teachers were
not teaching in the high demand fields of intervention specials, math or science.
5.
Implication for Action
An examination of the AEL route to solve supply and demand issues in education needs
to be examined as to its efficacy. Educational resources are dwindling and it is essential
that the supply and demand issues surrounding alternative routes to teaching be
addressed. How it can be assured that all of the resources placed into alternative teachers
are effectively and efficiently being used to assist our students’ growth and achievement?
2


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 2 of 4   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.