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Structural Support to Enhance Scholarly Productivity of Faculty
Unformatted Document Text:  support system centered around a Faculty Research Center (FRC), which offered consultation services, review of statistical and research principles, graduate assistant support, and other activities. While this development had tremendous symbolic significance by virtue of the dean’s dedication of resources and attention to the support system, the practical nature of the support mechanisms became immediately apparent. In the first year of the FRC, nearly 60% of all full-time faculty members used services of the Center. Among tenure-track, non-tenured faculty, 94% used services of the Center. The one non-user among the non-tenured faculty also resigned at the end of the year. Another component of the structural support involved creating a scholarship mentor program. This program paired in-coming tenure-track faculty members with successful and active researchers. With the goal of creating a positive self-fueling spiral of success (Hackman, 1990), the scholarship mentor program introduces new faculty members to the variety of supports available, including long-term consultation from seasoned colleagues. A key outcome of this program is a scholarship plan created by new faculty members. Successful deans remember their connections to faculty life (Merz, 2003), and in this recollection they can affirm what values they wish to see embodied in their SCDE. The symbolism of supporting research productivity, rather than merely increasing accountability pressures or expectations, sends a powerful message to reinforce the identity of faculty members as contributors to the development of knowledge. By embracing this role, faculty members can contribute to a productive future for teachers and schools. Section II: Methods and outcomesThis session method will consist of a paper presentation involving the following points in lecture format: the highly politicized context of educational research, characteristics of typical faculty members in SCDEs, the context of a particular university facing the common challenge of drawing faculty members into research activity, the specific features of the research support system that was developed (involving a faculty research center and associated services, a scholarship mentoring program for new faculty members, and incentives for engaging faculty in targeted research presentations), a description of the implementation of this program (including obstacles and detractors), and data on cost, use and impact. In addition to the oral presentation, specific documents from the program (such as the values statement and policy documents) will be distributed. Participants in this session can expect to learn the following important lessons: 1) how the broader context of conflicting scholarly expectations impacts the identity development of faculty members; 2) the importance of symbolic leadership in developing a supportive culture for scholarly productivity; 3) a specific and visionary model of support as a means of engaging faculty members in the broader community of research about schools; and 4) the costs and issues of concern associated with such structural support. References Bandura, A. (1982). Self-efficacy mechanism in human agency. American Psychologist, 37, 122-147. Boice, R. (2000). Advice for new faculty members: Nihil nimus. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Authors: Kain, Daniel., Denzine, Gypsy. and Martin, William.
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support system centered around a Faculty Research Center (FRC), which offered
consultation services, review of statistical and research principles, graduate assistant
support, and other activities. While this development had tremendous symbolic
significance by virtue of the dean’s dedication of resources and attention to the support
system, the practical nature of the support mechanisms became immediately apparent. In
the first year of the FRC, nearly 60% of all full-time faculty members used services of the
Center. Among tenure-track, non-tenured faculty, 94% used services of the Center. The
one non-user among the non-tenured faculty also resigned at the end of the year.
Another component of the structural support involved creating a scholarship
mentor program. This program paired in-coming tenure-track faculty members with
successful and active researchers. With the goal of creating a positive self-fueling spiral
of success (Hackman, 1990), the scholarship mentor program introduces new faculty
members to the variety of supports available, including long-term consultation from
seasoned colleagues. A key outcome of this program is a scholarship plan created by
new faculty members.
Successful deans remember their connections to faculty life (Merz, 2003), and in
this recollection they can affirm what values they wish to see embodied in their SCDE.
The symbolism of supporting research productivity, rather than merely increasing
accountability pressures or expectations, sends a powerful message to reinforce the
identity of faculty members as contributors to the development of knowledge. By
embracing this role, faculty members can contribute to a productive future for teachers
and schools.
Section II: Methods and outcomes
This session method will consist of a paper presentation involving the following
points in lecture format: the highly politicized context of educational research,
characteristics of typical faculty members in SCDEs, the context of a particular university
facing the common challenge of drawing faculty members into research activity, the
specific features of the research support system that was developed (involving a faculty
research center and associated services, a scholarship mentoring program for new faculty
members, and incentives for engaging faculty in targeted research presentations), a
description of the implementation of this program (including obstacles and detractors),
and data on cost, use and impact. In addition to the oral presentation, specific documents
from the program (such as the values statement and policy documents) will be
distributed.
Participants in this session can expect to learn the following important lessons: 1)
how the broader context of conflicting scholarly expectations impacts the identity
development of faculty members; 2) the importance of symbolic leadership in developing
a supportive culture for scholarly productivity; 3) a specific and visionary model of
support as a means of engaging faculty members in the broader community of research
about schools; and 4) the costs and issues of concern associated with such structural
support.
References
Bandura, A. (1982). Self-efficacy mechanism in human agency. American
Psychologist, 37, 122-147.
Boice, R. (2000). Advice for new faculty members: Nihil nimus. Boston: Allyn
& Bacon.


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