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“I Never Was Part of the Civil Rights Movement. I Always Wanted Human Rights”: Audley Moore and the Politics of Revolutionary Motherhood, 1955-1965

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Abstract:

Despite much recent research on the role of African American women in the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements, relatively little has been written about Audley Moore (1898-1997), an activist who made significant contributions to the black freedom struggle. This study traces the evolution of Moore's activism from 1955-1965, focusing on issues such as prisoners' rights, welfare rights, reparations, and the political education of young black radicals, to show how she sought human rights for African Americans. As founder and president of the Universal Association of Ethiopian Women (UAEW) in New Orleans in the mid-1950s, Moore protested racial bias in the application of capital punishment and in the state's rape and welfare laws by engaging in the politics of “revolutionary motherhood.” This political praxis combined Marxist internationalism, black nationalism, feminism, and maternalism with social justice activism, and Afro-Christian beliefs and practices. Active in both the South and the North during what is referred to as the “heroic era” of civil rights, Moore eschewed limited civil rights reforms in the hope that African Americans would obtain full human rights with the help of the international community. For example, she and the Ethiopian Women filed a petition with the United Nations in 1959, which charged the federal government of the United States with genocide. Moore also mentored young radicals, such as Malcolm X and Max Stanford. This study of her political ideology is an addition to the growing body of research that challenges traditional interpretations of the Civil Rights/Black Power eras.

Author's Keywords:

Audley Moore, African American women
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Association:
Name: Association for the Study of African American Life and History
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http://www.asalh.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p35671_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Gornall, Janet. "“I Never Was Part of the Civil Rights Movement. I Always Wanted Human Rights”: Audley Moore and the Politics of Revolutionary Motherhood, 1955-1965" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Hyatt Regency, Buffalo, New York USA, <Not Available>. 2013-12-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p35671_index.html>

APA Citation:

Gornall, J. "“I Never Was Part of the Civil Rights Movement. I Always Wanted Human Rights”: Audley Moore and the Politics of Revolutionary Motherhood, 1955-1965" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Hyatt Regency, Buffalo, New York USA <Not Available>. 2013-12-17 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p35671_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Despite much recent research on the role of African American women in the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements, relatively little has been written about Audley Moore (1898-1997), an activist who made significant contributions to the black freedom struggle. This study traces the evolution of Moore's activism from 1955-1965, focusing on issues such as prisoners' rights, welfare rights, reparations, and the political education of young black radicals, to show how she sought human rights for African Americans. As founder and president of the Universal Association of Ethiopian Women (UAEW) in New Orleans in the mid-1950s, Moore protested racial bias in the application of capital punishment and in the state's rape and welfare laws by engaging in the politics of “revolutionary motherhood.” This political praxis combined Marxist internationalism, black nationalism, feminism, and maternalism with social justice activism, and Afro-Christian beliefs and practices. Active in both the South and the North during what is referred to as the “heroic era” of civil rights, Moore eschewed limited civil rights reforms in the hope that African Americans would obtain full human rights with the help of the international community. For example, she and the Ethiopian Women filed a petition with the United Nations in 1959, which charged the federal government of the United States with genocide. Moore also mentored young radicals, such as Malcolm X and Max Stanford. This study of her political ideology is an addition to the growing body of research that challenges traditional interpretations of the Civil Rights/Black Power eras.

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Similar Titles:
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Social Movement Mobilization and Anti-Civil Rights Enforcement: Comparing the Mississippi and North Carolina Civil Rights Movements, 1955-1970


 
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