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Student Performance Reviews in a Teacher Preparation Program: Assuring Teacher Candidate Quality
Unformatted Document Text:  • Generate a dialogue about policies and practices used by participants’ teacher preparation programs to address concerns about teacher candidate quality. • Consider how policies and practices influence trust in the quality of teacher preparation programs. Methods. At Northern Illinois University, the Department of Teaching and Learning (TLRN) in the College of Education houses teacher preparation programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels in early childhood education, elementary education, and special education, graduating more than 450 teacher candidates each year. In TLRN, concerns arising from coursework or clinical experiences are dealt with through the Student Performance Review (SPR) process. This study examines the Student Performance Review (SPR) process as it occurred at Northern Illinois University for 35 teacher candidates over the 2002-2003, 2003-2004, and 2004-2005 academic years, with particular attention to how the SPR process serves the demands for quality teacher preparation. The SPR process can be seen as serving a “quality control” function in a teacher preparation program. This study employs a content analysis approach to the examination of the documents generated in 35 SPR cases. In this approach to document analysis, content analysis is “…a research methodology that utilizes a set of procedures to make valid inferences from the text” (Weber, 1985, p. 4). The content analysis of SPR reports from a three year period generates findings regarding demographics, point in the program in which the concern appeared, nature of the presenting concern, and SPR decision will be summarized for each of the three years and across the three-year period. Discussion will focus on the relationship between the presenting concern and program curriculum, whether and how remediation plans were developed, and the presence of factors leading to dismissal from the program. Conclusions will generate discussion about relate findings to larger questions of teacher candidate quality. References Ashby, C.M. (2003). College completion: Additional efforts could help education with its completion goals. Report to Congressional requesters. General Accounting Office, Washington, D.C. (GAO-03-568). Ginsberg, R. & Whaley, D. (2003). Admission and retention policies in teacher preparation programs: Legal and practical issues. The Teacher Educator (38):3, 169-189. Guffy, T. & Mann, G. (1999). Performance assessment team: A retention program revisited. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association of Teacher Education, Chicago, IL, February 13-17, 1999. Muir, S.P. & Leslie, S.C. (1990). Non-academic criteria: Accountability in pre-service teacher education. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, Chicago, IL, March 28-31, 1990.

Authors: Dorsch, Nina.
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Generate a dialogue about policies and practices used by participants’ teacher
preparation programs to address concerns about teacher candidate quality.
Consider how policies and practices influence trust in the quality of teacher
preparation programs.
Methods.
At Northern Illinois University, the Department of Teaching and Learning (TLRN) in the
College of Education houses teacher preparation programs at the undergraduate and
graduate levels in early childhood education, elementary education, and special
education, graduating more than 450 teacher candidates each year. In TLRN, concerns
arising from coursework or clinical experiences are dealt with through the Student
Performance Review (SPR) process. This study examines the Student Performance
Review (SPR) process as it occurred at Northern Illinois University for 35 teacher
candidates over the 2002-2003, 2003-2004, and 2004-2005 academic years, with
particular attention to how the SPR process serves the demands for quality teacher
preparation. The SPR process can be seen as serving a “quality control” function in a
teacher preparation program.
This study employs a content analysis approach to the examination of the documents
generated in 35 SPR cases. In this approach to document analysis, content analysis is “…
a research methodology that utilizes a set of procedures to make valid inferences from the
text” (Weber, 1985, p. 4). The content analysis of SPR reports from a three year period
generates findings regarding demographics, point in the program in which the concern
appeared, nature of the presenting concern, and SPR decision will be summarized for
each of the three years and across the three-year period. Discussion will focus on the
relationship between the presenting concern and program curriculum, whether and how
remediation plans were developed, and the presence of factors leading to dismissal from
the program. Conclusions will generate discussion about relate findings to larger
questions of teacher candidate quality.
References
Ashby, C.M. (2003). College completion: Additional efforts could help education with its
completion goals. Report to Congressional requesters. General Accounting
Office, Washington, D.C. (GAO-03-568).
Ginsberg, R. & Whaley, D. (2003). Admission and retention policies in teacher
preparation programs: Legal and practical issues. The Teacher Educator (38):3,
169-189.
Guffy, T. & Mann, G. (1999). Performance assessment team: A retention program
revisited. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association of Teacher
Education, Chicago, IL, February 13-17, 1999.
Muir, S.P. & Leslie, S.C. (1990). Non-academic criteria: Accountability in pre-service
teacher education. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American
Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, Chicago, IL, March 28-31, 1990.


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