All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Beyond the Blueberry Story: Helping Business Leaders Understand Teacher Preparation
Unformatted Document Text:  Strand II: Picturing Expanded Alliances II. Outcomes and Methods A. Learner/participant outcomes Participants will become more familiar with the types of business-educational groups and the various ways that they impact educational policy. The session will encourage participants to think about specific steps they can take to initiate or improve relations with these groups. B. Methods After using introductory questions to ascertain the knowledge and experience bases of session attendees in working with business-education coalitions, the presenter will share the previously identified aspects of the business-education policy group development, evolution, and interactions with schools and colleges of education. Discussion during the presentation and question/answer period will allow participants to share ideas about what works in their state and locale. Supplementary handouts will summarize ideas that participants can take and adapt to their particular context and setting. SOURCES McDaniel, J.E. and Miskel, C. G. (2002). The Effect of Groups and Individuals on National Decisionmaking: Influence and Domination in the Reading Policymaking Environment. CIERA Report #3-025 (October, 2002). McDaniel, J.E. and Miskel, C.G. (2002). “Stakeholder Salience: Business and Educational Policy.” Teachers College Record, 104:2 (March, 2002), pp. 325-356. Rigden, D. (1996). What Business Leaders Can Do to Help Change Teacher Education. ED 394 966. Sipple, J. W. et al. (1997) “The Creation and Development of an Interest Group: Life at the Intersection of Big Business and Education Reform,” Educational Administration Quarterly 33:4 (October, 1997), pp. 440-73. Usdan, M. (2002). “The New State Politics of Education,” State Education Standard, 3:2 (Spring 2002), pp. 14-18. Vollmer, J. (2000). The Blueberry Story (http://www.jamievollmer.com/blue_story.html). 3

Authors: Fly, Pamela.
first   previous   Page 3 of 3   next   last



background image
Strand II: Picturing Expanded Alliances
II. Outcomes and Methods
A. Learner/participant outcomes
Participants will become more familiar with the types of business-educational groups and the
various ways that they impact educational policy. The session will encourage participants to
think about specific steps they can take to initiate or improve relations with these groups.
B. Methods
After using introductory questions to ascertain the knowledge and experience bases of
session attendees in working with business-education coalitions, the presenter will share the
previously identified aspects of the business-education policy group development, evolution,
and interactions with schools and colleges of education. Discussion during the presentation
and question/answer period will allow participants to share ideas about what works in their
state and locale. Supplementary handouts will summarize ideas that participants can take and
adapt to their particular context and setting.
SOURCES
McDaniel, J.E. and Miskel, C. G. (2002). The Effect of Groups and Individuals on National
Decisionmaking: Influence and Domination in the Reading Policymaking Environment.
CIERA Report #3-025 (October, 2002).
McDaniel, J.E. and Miskel, C.G. (2002). “Stakeholder Salience: Business and Educational
Policy.” Teachers College Record, 104:2 (March, 2002), pp. 325-356.
Rigden, D. (1996). What Business Leaders Can Do to Help Change Teacher Education. ED
394 966.
Sipple, J. W. et al. (1997) “The Creation and Development of an Interest Group: Life at the
Intersection of Big Business and Education Reform,” Educational Administration
Quarterly 33:4
(October, 1997), pp. 440-73.
Usdan, M. (2002). “The New State Politics of Education,” State Education Standard, 3:2 (Spring
2002), pp. 14-18.
Vollmer, J. (2000). The Blueberry Story (http://www.jamievollmer.com/blue_story.html).
3


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 3   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.