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Building a State and University Partnership in Support of Induction for New Teachers
Unformatted Document Text:  Building a State and University Partnership in Support of Induction for New Teachers Section 1: ContentA. Statement of the Issue: Too many teachers are leaving the profession because they receive inadequate support, are overwhelmed with management concerns, and feel they have little voice in how decisions are made (Ingersoll, 2001; Stanulis & Burrill, 2004). The induction years should be recognized as a distinct phase in learning to teach (Feiman-Nemser, 2001) and a key place for learning, growth and support that occupies a special B. Literature Review: Good induction programs matter--they matter for retention, they matter for improving teacher quality, they matter for increasing teaching satisfaction, and openness to learning and collegial practice. place in the development of a teacher (Paine, Pimm, Britton, Raizen & Wilson, in press). The professional development experiences designed for this project as a state-wide initiative are based on the understanding that knowledge from engagement in PD can improve teaching practice. The tools and resources in this website: 1. Focus on critical problems of practice (Little, 1988) that are school-based and embedded in teacher work (Abdal-Haqq, 1995). 2. Provide for ways to develop skills long enough to ensure progressive gains in knowledge, skill, and confidence (Little, 1988). 3. Provide opportunities for teachers to ask your own questions, engage in research- based inquiry around your own questions, and reflect on new understandings around subject matter, students and learning, and teaching (Wilson & Berne, 1999). 4. Direct close attention to student learning and the contexts in which teaching takes place (Ball, 1996), which should in part guide assessment of its effectiveness (Abdal-Haqq, 1995). 5. Nudge educators to move from individual work to joint work (Lieberman & Miller, 2000), to recognize and foster teachers as professionals and leaders (Putnam & Borko, 1997) and to create a community of practice among teachers who study authentic issues together (Stanulis, Campbell & Hicks, 2002; Stanulis, Fallona & Pearson, 2002). 6. Place learning at the center of teaching (Lieberman & Miller), by providing way for teachers to continuously learn while tackling their own real world problems (Phlegar & Hurley, 1999). Through collegial engagement with the project resources, educators will enjoy learning together while also supporting beginning teacher learning. While some induction approaches rely upon lockstep march through the same questions, scenarios and problems, our approach starts with the premise that a self-empowered and proficient teacher is the goal and that, to get there, personal inquiry (guided and supported by a mentor) will be more effective than any pre-determined structure. With that in mind, the

Authors: smith, catherine., rockafellow, bonnie. and Stanulis, Randi.
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Building a State and University Partnership in Support of Induction for
New Teachers
Section 1: Content
A. Statement of the Issue:
Too many teachers are leaving the profession because they
receive inadequate support, are overwhelmed with management concerns, and feel they
have little voice in how decisions are made (Ingersoll, 2001; Stanulis & Burrill, 2004).
The induction years should be recognized as a distinct phase in learning to teach
(Feiman-Nemser, 2001) and a key place for learning, growth and support that occupies a
special
B. Literature Review: Good induction programs matter--they matter for retention, they
matter for improving teacher quality, they matter for increasing teaching satisfaction, and
openness to learning and collegial practice. place in the development of a teacher (Paine,
Pimm, Britton, Raizen & Wilson, in press).
The professional development experiences designed for this project as a state-wide
initiative are based on the understanding that knowledge from engagement in PD can
improve teaching practice. The tools and resources in this website:
1. Focus on critical problems of practice (Little, 1988) that are school-based and
embedded in teacher work (Abdal-Haqq, 1995).
2. Provide for ways to develop skills long enough to ensure progressive gains in
knowledge, skill, and confidence (Little, 1988).
3. Provide opportunities for teachers to ask your own questions, engage in research-
based inquiry around your own questions, and reflect on new understandings
around subject matter, students and learning, and teaching (Wilson & Berne,
1999).
4. Direct close attention to student learning and the contexts in which teaching takes
place (Ball, 1996), which should in part guide assessment of its effectiveness
(Abdal-Haqq, 1995).
5. Nudge educators to move from individual work to joint work (Lieberman &
Miller, 2000), to recognize and foster teachers as professionals and leaders
(Putnam & Borko, 1997) and to create a community of practice among teachers
who study authentic issues together (Stanulis, Campbell & Hicks, 2002; Stanulis,
Fallona & Pearson, 2002).
6. Place learning at the center of teaching (Lieberman & Miller), by providing way
for teachers to continuously learn while tackling their own real world problems
(Phlegar & Hurley, 1999).
Through collegial engagement with the project resources, educators will enjoy learning
together while also supporting beginning teacher learning. While some induction
approaches rely upon lockstep march through the same questions, scenarios and
problems, our approach starts with the premise that a self-empowered and proficient
teacher is the goal and that, to get there, personal inquiry (guided and supported by a
mentor) will be more effective than any pre-determined structure. With that in mind, the


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