All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Challenges and Opportunities for High-Quality Inclusion Teachers: Integration of Essential Core Teaching Strategies for Preservice Teacher Education
Unformatted Document Text:  Inclusion Models for Special Needs StudentsResearch strongly supports the intention of inclusive classroom advocates: that is, that greater academic expectations, a richer learning environment, more effective teaching strategies, and modeling by more able peers would enhance learning (Peterson & Hittie, 2003). Studies supporting inclusive education include: • Carlberg and Kavale (1980) in a meta-analysis of 50 studies showed more positive academic learning in integrated settings. • Cole and Meyer (1991) found that children in inclusive settings showed greater social competence, spent more time with peers, and less time alone. • Hunt, Farron-Davis, Beckstead, Curtis, and Goetz (1994) found that students with severe disabilities had more engagement, higher quality IEPs, and higher levels of social interaction in inclusive education. • Waldron and McLeskey (1998) found that mild LD students gained in reading in an inclusive class, and were equal in math; those with severe LD made equal progress in both inclusive and segregated settings. • Students with mild disabilities make better gains in inclusive classrooms than in pull-out programs (Banerji & Dailey, 1995; Deno, Maruyama, Espen, & Cohen, 1990; Fishbaugh & Gum, 1994; Jenkins, Jewell, Leicester, O’Connor, Jenkins, I Troutner, 1994). Teacher Accountability in Special EducationResearch indicates there are differences in the preparation of general education and special education teachers. However, research also suggests it is important to align special education preparation more closely to that for general education teachers. • Brownell, Ross, Colon, and McCallum (2003) describe seven characteristics of general education teacher education programs that are judged as highly effective. Most special education teacher education programs do include three aspects that focus on subject matter pedagogy, a clear vision of high quality teaching, and the use of active pedagogy. • Brownell et al. (2003) highlight the need for reflective practice by preservice special education teachers, but find it often lacking in programs C. Contribution Conference Strand: Imagining Future Students, Future TeachersThis proposal responds directly to these strand questions: • What are students going to have to know and be able to do in the future, and how do we know what these skills and knowledge will and should be? This program highlights the connections across standards for general education, special education, and literacy education within an inclusive model and supports teachers in making effective instructional decisions. • What forms of literacy will be necessary for future success, and how do we assure that teacher candidates are able to prepare their students to be multi-literate? This program highlights literacy in multiple forms, and supports teachers in integrating these multiple forms across the curriculum in a variety of ways. • What teaching skills and strategies are necessary to successfully prepare a cognitively, culturally, and linguistically diverse student population for the future, and how do we teach these skills and strategies to teacher candidates? This program highlights the diverse

Authors: Leitz, Paula. and Lewis, Jan.
first   previous   Page 2 of 4   next   last



background image
Inclusion Models for Special Needs Students
Research strongly supports the intention of inclusive classroom advocates: that
is, that greater academic expectations, a richer learning environment, more
effective teaching strategies, and modeling by more able peers would enhance
learning (Peterson & Hittie, 2003). Studies supporting inclusive education
include:
Carlberg and Kavale (1980) in a meta-analysis of 50 studies showed more
positive academic learning in integrated settings.
Cole and Meyer (1991) found that children in inclusive settings showed greater
social competence, spent more time with peers, and less time alone.
Hunt, Farron-Davis, Beckstead, Curtis, and Goetz (1994) found that students
with severe disabilities had more engagement, higher quality IEPs, and higher
levels of social interaction in inclusive education.
Waldron and McLeskey (1998) found that mild LD students gained in reading in
an inclusive class, and were equal in math; those with severe LD made equal
progress in both inclusive and segregated settings.
Students with mild disabilities make better gains in inclusive classrooms than in
pull-out programs (Banerji & Dailey, 1995; Deno, Maruyama, Espen, & Cohen,
1990; Fishbaugh & Gum, 1994; Jenkins, Jewell, Leicester, O’Connor, Jenkins, I
Troutner, 1994).
Teacher Accountability in Special Education
Research indicates there are differences in the preparation of general education and
special education teachers. However, research also suggests it is important to align
special education preparation more closely to that for general education teachers.
Brownell, Ross, Colon, and McCallum (2003) describe seven characteristics of
general education teacher education programs that are judged as highly effective.
Most special education teacher education programs do include three aspects that
focus on subject matter pedagogy, a clear vision of high quality teaching, and the
use of active pedagogy.
Brownell et al. (2003) highlight the need for reflective practice by preservice
special education teachers, but find it often lacking in programs
C. Contribution
Conference Strand: Imagining Future Students, Future Teachers
This proposal responds directly to these strand questions:
What are students going to have to know and be able to do in the
future, and how do we know what these skills and knowledge will
and should be? This program highlights the connections across
standards for general education, special education, and literacy
education within an inclusive model and supports teachers in making
effective instructional decisions.
What forms of literacy will be necessary for future success, and how
do we assure that teacher candidates are able to prepare their students
to be multi-literate? This program highlights literacy in multiple
forms, and supports teachers in integrating these multiple forms
across the curriculum in a variety of ways.
What teaching skills and strategies are necessary to successfully
prepare a cognitively, culturally, and linguistically diverse student
population for the future, and how do we teach these skills and
strategies to teacher candidates? This program highlights the diverse


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 2 of 4   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.