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More Effective Preservice Preparation in Special Education for School Counselors: Implications From Research
Unformatted Document Text:  3 particular course may also fluctuate. This had not been a specific focus of the current study. Further, additional research may be undertaken in regard to the quality of the content that had been covered. It was unclear from this study whether a particular course or workshop paid superficial attention to special education issues, or whether specific content was addressed in depth. Section II: Outcomes and Methods Learner/participant outcomes. The participants will learn of and discus the results of the research study and its implications for educational practice. They will discuss the importance of redesigning preservice school counselor training programs to include more special education content. In addition, they will critique suggested options for including more special education content in school counselor training, and apply them to their current educational environments and philosophies. Methods. The proposed format for the presentation is a poster session. This type of organizational format will encourage direct and professional dialogue among the conference participants. The session will be designed so that the initial information presented will be related to the research investigation, including: (a) the statement of the problem, (b) theoretical framework and rationale for the study, (c) research procedures and data analysis, (d) major findings and conclusions from the research, and (e) contribution and relevance to the field. This will be followed by a presentation of suggested options for including more special education content in school counselor training, again including such options as a modular approach for integrating special education content into existing courses, suggestions for additional or alternative coursework, and collaborative experiences for preservice school counselors with professionals working with students with special needs in practicum placements and internships. This format and sequence are intended to promote maximum audience interaction among the conference participants. References American School Counselor Association. (1993). The school counselor and Education of the Handicapped Act (Position Statement). Alexandria, VA: Author.Bowen, M. C., & Glenn, E. E. (1998). Counseling interventions for students who have mild disabilities. Professional School Counseling, 2, 17-25. Frantz, C. S., & Prillaman, D. (1993). State certification endorsement for school counselors: Special education requirements. School Counselor, 40, 375-379. Helms, N. E., & Katsiyannis, A. (1992). Counselors in elementary schools: Making it work for students with disabilities. School Counselor, 39, 232-237. Korinek, L., & Prillaman, D. (1992). Counselors and exceptional students: Preparation versus practice. Counselor Education and Supervision, 32, 3-11. McEachern, A. G. (2003). School counselor preparation to meet the guidance needs of exceptional students; A national study. Counselor Education and Supervision, 42, 314-325. Milsom, A. S. (2002). Students with disabilities: School counselor involvement and preparation. Professional School Counseling, 3, 331-338. Scarborough, L. L. & Deck, M. D. (1998). The challenges of working for students with disabilities: A view from the front lines. Professional School Counseling, 2, 10-25. Wood Dunn, N. A., & Baker, S. B. (2002). Readiness to serve students with disabilities: A survey of elementary school counselors. Professional School Counseling, 5, 277-

Authors: Quigney, Theresa.
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particular course may also fluctuate. This had not been a specific focus of the current
study. Further, additional research may be undertaken in regard to the quality of the
content that had been covered. It was unclear from this study whether a particular course
or workshop paid superficial attention to special education issues, or whether specific
content was addressed in depth.
Section II: Outcomes and Methods
Learner/participant outcomes.
The participants will learn of and discus the results of
the research study and its implications for educational practice. They will discuss the
importance of redesigning preservice school counselor training programs to include more
special education content. In addition, they will critique suggested options for including
more special education content in school counselor training, and apply them to their
current educational environments and philosophies.
Methods. The proposed format for the presentation is a poster session. This type of
organizational format will encourage direct and professional dialogue among the
conference participants.
The session will be designed so that the initial information presented will be related to
the research investigation, including: (a) the statement of the problem, (b) theoretical
framework and rationale for the study, (c) research procedures and data analysis, (d)
major findings and conclusions from the research, and (e) contribution and relevance to
the field. This will be followed by a presentation of suggested options for including more
special education content in school counselor training, again including such options as a
modular approach for integrating special education content into existing courses,
suggestions for additional or alternative coursework, and collaborative experiences for
preservice school counselors with professionals working with students with special needs
in practicum placements and internships. This format and sequence are intended to
promote maximum audience interaction among the conference participants.
References
American School Counselor Association. (1993). The school counselor and Education of
the Handicapped Act (Position Statement).
Alexandria, VA: Author.
Bowen, M. C., & Glenn, E. E. (1998). Counseling interventions for students who have
mild disabilities. Professional School Counseling, 2, 17-25.
Frantz, C. S., & Prillaman, D. (1993). State certification endorsement for school
counselors: Special education requirements. School Counselor, 40, 375-379.
Helms, N. E., & Katsiyannis, A. (1992). Counselors in elementary schools: Making it
work for students with disabilities. School Counselor, 39, 232-237.
Korinek, L., & Prillaman, D. (1992). Counselors and exceptional students: Preparation
versus practice. Counselor Education and Supervision, 32, 3-11.
McEachern, A. G. (2003). School counselor preparation to meet the guidance needs of
exceptional students; A national study. Counselor Education and Supervision, 42,
314-325.
Milsom, A. S. (2002). Students with disabilities: School counselor involvement and
preparation. Professional School Counseling, 3, 331-338.
Scarborough, L. L. & Deck, M. D. (1998). The challenges of working for students with
disabilities: A view from the front lines. Professional School Counseling, 2, 10-25.
Wood Dunn, N. A., & Baker, S. B. (2002). Readiness to serve students with disabilities:
A survey of elementary school counselors. Professional School Counseling, 5, 277-


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