All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Developing a Model to Encourage Study Abroad in Teacher Education
Unformatted Document Text:  AACTE PROPOSAL A. Statement of the Issue In most cases, teacher education programs place a heavy emphasis upon courses in pedagogy and fewer courses in liberal arts content, much less content related to internationalization. In addition, the percentage of university students from all disciplines who study abroad is about 1%. Education majors would be included in this total and comprise an even smaller percentage. Teacher education programs must look to internationalize their curriculum as well as engage their students in reaching beyond their borders to become citizens of the world. Today’s future teachers need to prepare themselves and their future students to function effectively in a global society and universities must find ways to make this happen. B. Literature Review In January of 2000, the Carnegie Corporation of New York brought together representatives from associations, organization, agencies and foundations interested in strengthening American understanding of the world through education. Participants found that there was some interest in integrating global perspectives into the curriculum and giving faculty and students international experience but they concluded that “American students’ knowledge of the world remains limited and that baseline data, assessment and dissemination of new approaches, and sustained commitment to implementation required for institutionalization in schools do not yet exist.” They thought that international and global perspectives must be an integral part of 21 st century from kindergarten through graduate school. The Carnegie Report said, “Start with the teachers: globally aware, internationally knowledgeable teachers are the key to all of these strategic opportunities.” According to Manzo (April, 2005), proponents of international education in the United States have had to broach the subject delicately. Although experts feel there is agreement about the importance of going global or teaching international understanding, trying to infuse international education into the curriculum hits resistance at the state, district, and school levels. Proponents feel that “building students’ world knowledge would enrich the curriculum, engage students, improve school performance, and help children deal with the increasingly diverse communities in which they live…their success will require that they understand how culture, religion, politics, and history influence the world’s social and economic well-being.” It will be difficult for this to happen if our teachers lack knowledge in this area and how to infuse it into the curriculum. In the Diversity Digest (Vol.8 no.3, 2005) issued by the Association of American Colleges and Universities, Hovland reports that in the past institutions tried to introduce students to diversity, global perspectives, and social responsibility through revision of their general education curricula. While this was relatively successful, some universities attempted with less success to infuse students’ majors with an emphasis upon these same issues. Others were more successful with the creation of interdisciplinary majors or minors. “Nearly all showed great creativity in using global frameworks to link majors to other kinds of curricular innovation: internships, study abroad, service learning, short-

Authors: Allen, Camille. and Antone, George.
first   previous   Page 1 of 3   next   last



background image
AACTE PROPOSAL
A. Statement of the Issue
In most cases, teacher education programs place a heavy emphasis upon courses in
pedagogy and fewer courses in liberal arts content, much less content related to
internationalization. In addition, the percentage of university students from all
disciplines who study abroad is about 1%. Education majors would be included in this
total and comprise an even smaller percentage. Teacher education programs must look to
internationalize their curriculum as well as engage their students in reaching beyond their
borders to become citizens of the world. Today’s future teachers need to prepare
themselves and their future students to function effectively in a global society and
universities must find ways to make this happen.

B. Literature Review
In January of 2000, the Carnegie Corporation of New York brought together
representatives from associations, organization, agencies and foundations interested in
strengthening American understanding of the world through education. Participants found
that there was some interest in integrating global perspectives into the curriculum and
giving faculty and students international experience but they concluded that “American
students’ knowledge of the world remains limited and that baseline data, assessment and
dissemination of new approaches, and sustained commitment to implementation required
for institutionalization in schools do not yet exist.” They thought that international and
global perspectives must be an integral part of 21
st
century from kindergarten through
graduate school. The Carnegie Report said, “Start with the teachers: globally aware,
internationally knowledgeable teachers are the key to all of these strategic opportunities.”
According to Manzo (April, 2005), proponents of international education in the United
States have had to broach the subject delicately. Although experts feel there is agreement
about the importance of going global or teaching international understanding, trying to
infuse international education into the curriculum hits resistance at the state, district, and
school levels. Proponents feel that “building students’ world knowledge would enrich
the curriculum, engage students, improve school performance, and help children deal
with the increasingly diverse communities in which they live…their success will require
that they understand how culture, religion, politics, and history influence the world’s
social and economic well-being.” It will be difficult for this to happen if our teachers lack
knowledge in this area and how to infuse it into the curriculum.
In the Diversity Digest (Vol.8 no.3, 2005) issued by the Association of American
Colleges and Universities, Hovland reports that in the past institutions tried to introduce
students to diversity, global perspectives, and social responsibility through revision of
their general education curricula. While this was relatively successful, some universities
attempted with less success to infuse students’ majors with an emphasis upon these same
issues. Others were more successful with the creation of interdisciplinary majors or
minors. “Nearly all showed great creativity in using global frameworks to link majors to
other kinds of curricular innovation: internships, study abroad, service learning, short-


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 1 of 3   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.