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Developing Leaders to Foster Instructional Change
Unformatted Document Text:  “proactive, committed, and decisive individuals who are willing to take risks while looking for creative ways to solve problems.” Bolman and Deal (1997, p. xii) also note that “when organizations are over-managed but under-led, they eventually lose any sense of spirit.” Additionally, Bolman and Deal (1997) emphasize that when the rational and technical side of organizations is overemphasized, decline or demise of the organization usually follows. Caruso and Salovey (2004) assert that six core areas exist for leaders/managers—building effective teams, planning and deciding effectively, motivating people, communicating a vision, promoting change, and creating effective interpersonal relationships. Glickman (2002) indicates that instructional leaders should use the behaviors of listening, clarifying, encouraging, reflecting, presenting, problem-solving, negotiating, directing, standardizing, and reinforcing when working with teachers—behaviors not typically associated with managers and rarely fully addressed in traditional leadership preparation programs. Reeves (2004) also points out that leadership at its best means that school leaders examine their holistic accountability for the welfare of teachers and students. Halpern and Lubar (2003) emphasize that explicit values that guide one’s actions are necessary for effective leaders and that true leadership goes far beyond just accomplishing tasks, but rather includes motivating, inspiring, and energizing complete organizations. Educational leadership programs must take more responsibility for providing opportunities for program participants to develop their capacity to lead using their value systems. As Warren Bennis (1994, p.40) so aptly put it “…Until you truly know yourself, strengths and weaknesses, know what you want to do and why you want to do it, you cannot succeed in any but the most superficial sense of the word. The leader never lies to himself….” How the leadership preparation program presented infuses ethical, values-driven decision making will be shared. Participants will also be asked to provide additional examples of values inclusion in their institutional leadership programs. C. Contribution: The leadership preparation program described in the presentation will illustrate a model that builds upon a broader understanding of the craft of leadership. Specific model components will support the role of school leadership as a catalyst for bringing about social change for both school and community through ethical, value-added leadership strategies. Support for programs which challenge the status-quo is needed if appropriate social change is to be sustained. Current school leadership support from legislative bodies, state departments of education, national educational organizations, and the public in general is meager.Programs illustrative of appropriate revitalization need additional exposure so they are broadly recognized as a means of contributing to positive social change. The program to be discussed has ensured that a diverse group of participants was selected for each cohort. Variety in relation to gender, race, geography, and district demographics ensures that a broad range of perspectives is present during discussion seminars. Additionally, internship assignments are made in diverse settings for each cohort member rather than allowing internships to occur in self-

Authors: House, Lynn. and Varner, Lynn.
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“proactive, committed, and decisive individuals who are willing to take risks
while looking for creative ways to solve problems.” Bolman and Deal (1997,
p. xii) also note that “when organizations are over-managed but under-led, they
eventually lose any sense of spirit.” Additionally, Bolman and Deal (1997)
emphasize that when the rational and technical side of organizations is
overemphasized, decline or demise of the organization usually follows. Caruso
and Salovey (2004) assert that six core areas exist for leaders/managers—building
effective teams, planning and deciding effectively, motivating people,
communicating a vision, promoting change, and creating effective interpersonal
relationships. Glickman (2002) indicates that instructional leaders should use the
behaviors of listening, clarifying, encouraging, reflecting, presenting, problem-
solving, negotiating, directing, standardizing, and reinforcing when working with
teachers—behaviors not typically associated with managers and rarely fully
addressed in traditional leadership preparation programs. Reeves (2004) also
points out that leadership at its best means that school leaders examine their
holistic accountability for the welfare of teachers and students.
Halpern and Lubar (2003) emphasize that explicit values that guide one’s actions
are necessary for effective leaders and that true leadership goes far beyond just
accomplishing tasks, but rather includes motivating, inspiring, and energizing
complete organizations. Educational leadership programs must take more
responsibility for providing opportunities for program participants to develop
their capacity to lead using their value systems. As Warren Bennis (1994, p.40)
so aptly put it “…Until you truly know yourself, strengths and weaknesses, know
what you want to do and why you want to do it, you cannot succeed in any but the
most superficial sense of the word. The leader never lies to himself….”
How the leadership preparation program presented infuses ethical, values-driven
decision making will be shared. Participants will also be asked to provide
additional examples of values inclusion in their institutional leadership programs.
C. Contribution:
The leadership preparation program described in the presentation will
illustrate a model that builds upon a broader understanding of the craft of
leadership. Specific model components will support the role of school leadership
as a catalyst for bringing about social change for both school and community
through ethical, value-added leadership strategies. Support for programs which
challenge the status-quo is needed if appropriate social change is to be sustained.
Current school leadership support from legislative bodies, state departments of
education, national educational organizations, and the public in general is meager.
Programs illustrative of appropriate revitalization need additional exposure so
they are broadly recognized as a means of contributing to positive social change.
The program to be discussed has ensured that a diverse group of participants was
selected for each cohort. Variety in relation to gender, race, geography, and
district demographics ensures that a broad range of perspectives is present during
discussion seminars. Additionally, internship assignments are made in diverse
settings for each cohort member rather than allowing internships to occur in self-


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