All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Learning to Do Action Research: Helping Preservice Teachers Develop Strategies to Meet Diverse Learning Needs
Unformatted Document Text:  Implication for Action: Above all else, this work allows teacher candidates to see themselves as powerful in the classroom, able to study and effect change on their own practices in order to support students’ learning needs. Developing the habit of mind to analyze and address practice-based issues encourages teacher candidates to feel that students’ diverse learning needs are regular aspects of classroom life to be addressed rather than deficits or drawbacks for classroom success. Further, this work has reinforced our efforts and intentions as teacher educators to ensure that students have the opportunity to realize their own power as teachers who are capable of making appropriate changes in their classrooms to improve student learning. This attitude will go a great distance towards supporting teacher candidates’ sense of self as a reflective, inquisitive teacher during early career settings. Section II: Learner/participant Outcomes: We hope that participants will learn more about the potential uses for action research as one method to help teacher candidates learn to recognize and address student diversity in the classroom. This kind of work fosters an attitude of curiosity and activism in the university classroom. As such, we would like participants to walk away with an appreciation of and challenge to think about inquiry as a practice to prepare future teachers for all learners. Methods: This proposal is for a paper presentation to be engaged in collaboratively with both authors playing roles in the presentation. In order to engage the audience as actively as possible during a short paper presentation period, we will use visuals (e.g. overhead/PowerPoint slides) and share artifacts from our students’ work as action researchers as a part of our presentation. References: Auger, W. and Wideman, R. (2000). Using action research to open the door to life-longprofessional learning. Education, 121(1), 120-127. Chant, R.H., Heafner, T.L., and Bennett, K.R. (2004). Connecting personal theorizingand action research in preservice teacher development. Teacher Education Quarterly,31(3), 35-42. Feiman-Nemser, S. (2000). From preparation to practice: Designing a continuum tostrengthen and sustain teaching. New York, Bank Street College of Education: 56. Goatley, V., Highfield, K., Bentley, J., Pardo, L., Folkert, J., Scherer, P., Raphael, T., andGrattan, K. (1994). Empowering teachers to be researchers: A collaborative approach. Teacher Researcher, 1(2), 128-144. Grant, C. A. and C. A. Zozakiewicz (1995). Student Teachers, Cooperating Teachers, andSupervisors: Interrupting the Multicultural Silences of Student Teaching. DevelopingMulticultural Teacher Education Curricula. C. E. Sleeter. Albany, New York, StateUniversity of New York Press: 259-278. Learning to Do Action ResearchPage 3 of 4

Authors: Bates, Alisa. and Pardo, Laura.
first   previous   Page 3 of 4   next   last



background image
Implication for Action:
Above all else, this work allows teacher candidates to see themselves as powerful in the
classroom, able to study and effect change on their own practices in order to support students’
learning needs. Developing the habit of mind to analyze and address practice-based issues
encourages teacher candidates to feel that students’ diverse learning needs are regular aspects of
classroom life to be addressed rather than deficits or drawbacks for classroom success. Further,
this work has reinforced our efforts and intentions as teacher educators to ensure that students
have the opportunity to realize their own power as teachers who are capable of making
appropriate changes in their classrooms to improve student learning. This attitude will go a great
distance towards supporting teacher candidates’ sense of self as a reflective, inquisitive teacher
during early career settings.
Section II:
Learner/participant Outcomes:
We hope that participants will learn more about the potential uses for action research as
one method to help teacher candidates learn to recognize and address student diversity in the
classroom. This kind of work fosters an attitude of curiosity and activism in the university
classroom. As such, we would like participants to walk away with an appreciation of and
challenge to think about inquiry as a practice to prepare future teachers for all learners.
Methods:
This proposal is for a paper presentation to be engaged in collaboratively with both
authors playing roles in the presentation. In order to engage the audience as actively as possible
during a short paper presentation period, we will use visuals (e.g. overhead/PowerPoint slides)
and share artifacts from our students’ work as action researchers as a part of our presentation.
References:
Auger, W. and Wideman, R. (2000). Using action research to open the door to life-long
professional learning. Education, 121(1), 120-127.
Chant, R.H., Heafner, T.L., and Bennett, K.R. (2004). Connecting personal theorizing
and action research in preservice teacher development. Teacher Education Quarterly,
31(3), 35-42.
Feiman-Nemser, S. (2000). From preparation to practice: Designing a continuum to
strengthen and sustain teaching. New York, Bank Street College of Education: 56.
Goatley, V., Highfield, K., Bentley, J., Pardo, L., Folkert, J., Scherer, P., Raphael, T., and
Grattan, K. (1994). Empowering teachers to be researchers: A collaborative approach.
Teacher Researcher, 1(2), 128-144.
Grant, C. A. and C. A. Zozakiewicz (1995). Student Teachers, Cooperating Teachers, and
Supervisors: Interrupting the Multicultural Silences of Student Teaching. Developing
Multicultural Teacher Education Curricula. C. E. Sleeter. Albany, New York, State
University of New York Press: 259-278.
Learning to Do Action Research
Page 3 of 4


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 4   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.