All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Teachers' and Preservice Teachers' Attitudes Toward and Efficacy in Classroom Assessment in the Environment of Standardized Testing
Unformatted Document Text:  Athanases and Achinstein (2003) suggest that veteran teachers need to reflect on and reevaluate their own practices and beliefs in identifying student learning styles, writing lesson objectives, designing instructional strategies, and defining appropriate assessment practices while working as a mentor to the new teacher. They believe that a potential for mentoring, that of helping new teachers to focus on the learners, has not yet been met. In order for this potential to be met, there must be an expansion of the mentor’s knowledge base in how teaching relates to students. They further support research on how new teachers through the mentoring process are better able to understand the necessity of focusing on their students’ performances. They call for both the university teacher education programs as well as the mentor teachers to help new teachers become more sensitive and committed to improving all students’ academic development. Contribution The domain of classroom assessment and the level of competency that teachers need to have with it becomes multidimensional and challenged by the best practices for assessing students’ work, by teachers’ level of assessment literacy, and by the best practices for helping preservice teachers develop a better sense of efficacy toward assessment. In addition, as we establish new views of instruction, older views of testing are being challenged. The new views of instruction, guided by the student-centered paradigm, call into question the efficacy of the previous views of testing held over from the traditional, teacher-centered paradigm. The conceptual albeit intrusive newcomer to this dichotomy call for standardized testing and the necessity for school-aged students to be able to transfer their classroom knowledge to positive results on such tests. The responsibility for training our future teachers in this area has become more and more complicated when considering this multidimensionality of assessment. While preparing our future teachers to design student-centered classrooms, we cannot overlook the importance of the best practices for training them in also designing compatable assessments. We also need to help them reach an attitudinal acceptance, a more comfortable relationship, and a deeper understanding of classroom assessment. Relevance Crossing over to the other side of the desk, moving out of their egocentric mindset to realize the necessity of focusing on their students as individual learners does not come naturally for new teachers. Teacher educators, charged with identifying the best means for training future teachers as the classroom, may be able to influence this mindset through the use of quantitative and qualitative methodologies along with their own professional collaboration with other teacher educators. Hamilton and Rademaker (2005) in working with teachers in a mentor teacher preparation program heard some of the most passionate conversations both in class and online discussion strands from participants regarding standardized testing and the felt need to help all students do well on those tests. Because one of the objectives for the program was to have participants reflect on and evaluate their assessment practices, considerable effort was spent in creating meaningful discussions and activities geared toward the hope of helping the teachers improve their own assessment practices and in turn in helping their students improve standardized tests results. But in a follow-up survey, the participants indicated no concerns regarding their own competencies in designing assessment practices or in improving those practices. Further follow-up, 2

Authors: Hamilton, Karen.
first   previous   Page 2 of 5   next   last



background image
Athanases and Achinstein (2003) suggest that veteran teachers need to reflect on
and reevaluate their own practices and beliefs in identifying student learning styles,
writing lesson objectives, designing instructional strategies, and defining appropriate
assessment practices while working as a mentor to the new teacher. They believe that a
potential for mentoring, that of helping new teachers to focus on the learners, has not yet
been met. In order for this potential to be met, there must be an expansion of the
mentor’s knowledge base in how teaching relates to students. They further support
research on how new teachers through the mentoring process are better able to
understand the necessity of focusing on their students’ performances. They call for both
the university teacher education programs as well as the mentor teachers to help new
teachers become more sensitive and committed to improving all students’ academic
development.
Contribution
The domain of classroom assessment and the level of competency that teachers
need to have with it becomes multidimensional and challenged by the best practices for
assessing students’ work, by teachers’ level of assessment literacy, and by the best
practices for helping preservice teachers develop a better sense of efficacy toward
assessment. In addition, as we establish new views of instruction, older views of testing
are being challenged. The new views of instruction, guided by the student-centered
paradigm, call into question the efficacy of the previous views of testing held over from
the traditional, teacher-centered paradigm. The conceptual albeit intrusive newcomer to
this dichotomy call for standardized testing and the necessity for school-aged students to
be able to transfer their classroom knowledge to positive results on such tests.
The responsibility for training our future teachers in this area has become more
and more complicated when considering this multidimensionality of assessment. While
preparing our future teachers to design student-centered classrooms, we cannot overlook
the importance of the best practices for training them in also designing compatable
assessments. We also need to help them reach an attitudinal acceptance, a more
comfortable relationship, and a deeper understanding of classroom assessment.
Relevance
Crossing over to the other side of the desk, moving out of their egocentric mindset
to realize the necessity of focusing on their students as individual learners does not come
naturally for new teachers. Teacher educators, charged with identifying the best means
for training future teachers as the classroom, may be able to influence this mindset
through the use of quantitative and qualitative methodologies along with their own
professional collaboration with other teacher educators.
Hamilton and Rademaker (2005) in working with teachers in a mentor teacher
preparation program heard some of the most passionate conversations both in class and
online discussion strands from participants regarding standardized testing and the felt
need to help all students do well on those tests. Because one of the objectives for the
program was to have participants reflect on and evaluate their assessment practices,
considerable effort was spent in creating meaningful discussions and activities geared
toward the hope of helping the teachers improve their own assessment practices and in
turn in helping their students improve standardized tests results. But in a follow-up
survey, the participants indicated no concerns regarding their own competencies in
designing assessment practices or in improving those practices. Further follow-up,
2


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 2 of 5   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.