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Teacher Development Through Dynamic Partnerships: Discussion of the Collaborative, Ongoing, Reciprocal Education Plan (The CORE Plan)
Unformatted Document Text:  Opportunities for clinical practica are mandated for teacher training in course-embedded field experiences and/or student teaching, but the expectations and demands of the constituents in the practica frequently diverge and cause dissonance (Feiman-Nemser & Buchmann, 1985)). Participants enact prescribed roles in superordinate and subordinate positions (e.g., teacher educator, cooperating teacher, teacher candidate) (Feiman-Nemser & Buchmann, 1985). The emphasis in teacher preparation plans of this nature is on an established hierarchy and chain of command (Feiman-Nemser & Buchmann, 1985). Upon completion of traditional programs as described above, teacher candidates often report a very limited sense of teacher efficacy, confidence in one’s ability to integrate knowledge, skills, and dispositions to teach effectively because they are not engaged in developing their own professional identities (Smagorinsky, Cook, Moore, Jackson and Fry, 2004). A new vision of college/school partnerships is an alliance. In this alliance, all constituents have vested interests, marked by commonly agreed upon goals, collaboration, reciprocity, and ongoing support (Darling-Hammond, 1994; Dilworth & Imig, 1995; Rainer & Matthews, 2002; Wise, 1989). C-Contribution: This work moves beyond simply picturing expanded alliances described in Strand II. It provides a concrete vision for designing and implementing a collaborative, ongoing, reciprocal partnership between a teacher preparation college and a public elementary school. Furthermore, it provides empirical evidence of the implications of such a collaborative. D-Relevance: As stated previously, this work reflects current national and state policies related to teacher education (NCATE, 2000; NYSED, 2004). Outcomes from the ongoing, qualitative study of the CORE Plan have the potential to inform current and future policy and practice as it relates to teacher education and professional development. E-Implication for Action: This study is of educational importance because it redefines the field experiences and teacher induction required in teacher education programs. It is also a new vision of professional development. As such, The CORE Plan is a viable model. It provides insight into the ways in which a meaningful alliance between a teacher education program and an elementary school can foster effective teaching practices, professional development, and innovation. Section II: Outcomes and MethodsA. Learner/participant outcomes. Participants will learn about new ways to approach field-embedded course experiences that will benefit teacher candidates and teachers. This presentation demonstrates how a reciprocal approach incorporates true collaboration among all participants. It also highlights the importance of choosing a strategic focus that is articulated by the participants to reflect their immediate needs. B. Methods The presentation will begin with a description of the design and implementation of The CORE Plan. The design, methods and analysis of The CORE Plan study will then be described. Outcomes of The CORE Plan study will be shared. Evidence of outcomes will be provided through the use of printed transcripts and DVD clips of taped interviews

Authors: Bogan, Huey., Flihan, Sheila., Margolin, Marcia. and Schaefer, Joseph.
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Opportunities for clinical practica are mandated for teacher training in course-embedded
field experiences and/or student teaching, but the expectations and demands of the
constituents in the practica frequently diverge and cause dissonance (Feiman-Nemser &
Buchmann, 1985)). Participants enact prescribed roles in superordinate and subordinate
positions (e.g., teacher educator, cooperating teacher, teacher candidate) (Feiman-Nemser
& Buchmann, 1985). The emphasis in teacher preparation plans of this nature is on an
established hierarchy and chain of command (Feiman-Nemser & Buchmann, 1985).
Upon completion of traditional programs as described above, teacher candidates often
report a very limited sense of teacher efficacy, confidence in one’s ability to integrate
knowledge, skills, and dispositions to teach effectively because they are not engaged in
developing their own professional identities (Smagorinsky, Cook, Moore, Jackson and
Fry, 2004). A new vision of college/school partnerships is an alliance. In this alliance, all
constituents have vested interests, marked by commonly agreed upon goals,
collaboration, reciprocity, and ongoing support (Darling-Hammond, 1994; Dilworth &
Imig, 1995; Rainer & Matthews, 2002; Wise, 1989).
C-Contribution: This work moves beyond simply picturing expanded alliances
described in Strand II. It provides a concrete vision for designing and implementing a
collaborative, ongoing, reciprocal partnership between a teacher preparation college and a
public elementary school. Furthermore, it provides empirical evidence of the
implications of such a collaborative.
D-Relevance: As stated previously, this work reflects current national and state policies
related to teacher education (NCATE, 2000; NYSED, 2004). Outcomes from the
ongoing, qualitative study of the CORE Plan have the potential to inform current and
future policy and practice as it relates to teacher education and professional development.
E-Implication for Action: This study is of educational importance because it redefines
the field experiences and teacher induction required in teacher education programs. It is
also a new vision of professional development. As such, The CORE Plan is a viable
model. It provides insight into the ways in which a meaningful alliance between a
teacher education program and an elementary school can foster effective teaching
practices, professional development, and innovation.
Section II: Outcomes and Methods
A. Learner/participant outcomes.
Participants will learn about new ways to approach
field-embedded course experiences that will benefit teacher candidates and teachers.
This presentation demonstrates how a reciprocal approach incorporates true collaboration
among all participants. It also highlights the importance of choosing a strategic focus
that is articulated by the participants to reflect their immediate needs.
B. Methods
The presentation will begin with a description of the design and implementation of The
CORE Plan. The design, methods and analysis of The CORE Plan study will then be
described. Outcomes of The CORE Plan study will be shared. Evidence of outcomes
will be provided through the use of printed transcripts and DVD clips of taped interviews


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