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Not Lost in Translation: The Impact of Community-Based Learning on Beginning Teachers
Unformatted Document Text:  take are popular methods used to acquaint these students with diversity, community-based learning has also been advocated as another form of preparation for preservice teachers. Sleeter (2001) reviewed the literature on community-based cross-cultural immersion programs and their reported effects on preservice teachers’ views and capabilities of their students as well as themselves as teachers. Sleeter, however, noted that convincing more teacher educators that the inclusion of such programs and activities in teacher preparation programs is “more difficulty without a stronger research base” (p. 4). Furthermore, she also noted in the 2004 Fall Division K Newsletter, that schools of education must do a better job in following up their graduates. What better way to inform policy and practitioners that to follow a group of preservice teachers-who participated in a program that was infused with community-based experiences beyond the school-through their first three-five years of teaching. Contribution The significance of this presentation is to strengthen the aforementioned research base by documenting ways that a group of beginning teachers used the skills acquired in a preservice teacher education seminar where community-based learning was used. Additionally, the beginning teachers not only learned about their students, their families, and their home communities, they also discovered information about themselves (realizations of privilege, prejudice, and oppression) and how it could affect their teaching. The contribution of this presentation would also fulfill the vision of a different kind of teacher education to be added to the core structure of course development, preparation, and delivery for teacher educators. Therefore, the findings of the presentation could inform policy by advocating that community-based learning, beyond the traditional school-based internship, be a requirement in teacher education preparation. Furthermore, knowledge of students beyond the school environment can enhance teachers’ instructional delivery by helping them make the content more culturally relevant for their all their students. Relevance This proposal provides qualitative evidence, over a period of two years, of the impact of a community-based program/curriculum implemented during the junior year in college and extended through the first two years of teaching. The proposal suggests what preservice teachers are going to have to know in order to build better relationships with their students and students’ families. The purpose of this session is to: 1) describe how a series of community-based learning activities, completed during their preservice teacher education experience, impacted beginning teachers’ practice two years later; 2) share a model of community-based learning that was used in a seminar with preservice teachers; 3) encourage the use of community-based learning as an avenue of preservice teacher preparation and as ongoing professional development and implementation for inservice teach. [If we don’t, how will we know the impact of their learning, specifically their multicultural education learning, received from IHEs?] Moreover, articles have been written that share ways to close the widening academic gap; however, few articles, as Sleeter (2001) notes, consider the home-community connection as a way to raise and support academic achievement among African American students and students of color. For preservice teachers to learn to make home-community

Authors: Cooper, Jewell E..
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take are popular methods used to acquaint these students with diversity, community-
based learning has also been advocated as another form of preparation for preservice
teachers. Sleeter (2001) reviewed the literature on community-based cross-cultural
immersion programs and their reported effects on preservice teachers’ views and
capabilities of their students as well as themselves as teachers. Sleeter, however, noted
that convincing more teacher educators that the inclusion of such programs and activities
in teacher preparation programs is “more difficulty without a stronger research base” (p.
4). Furthermore, she also noted in the 2004 Fall Division K Newsletter, that schools of
education must do a better job in following up their graduates.
What better way to inform
policy and practitioners that to follow a group of preservice teachers-who participated in
a program that was infused with community-based experiences beyond the school-
through their first three-five years of teaching.
Contribution
The significance of this presentation is to strengthen the aforementioned research base by
documenting ways that a group of beginning teachers used the skills acquired in a
preservice teacher education seminar where community-based learning was used.
Additionally, the beginning teachers not only learned about their students, their families,
and their home communities, they also discovered information about themselves
(realizations of privilege, prejudice, and oppression) and how it could affect their
teaching. The contribution of this presentation would also fulfill the vision of a different
kind of teacher education to be added to the core structure of course development,
preparation, and delivery for teacher educators. Therefore, the findings of the
presentation could inform policy by advocating that community-based learning, beyond
the traditional school-based internship, be a requirement in teacher education preparation.
Furthermore, knowledge of students beyond the school environment can enhance
teachers’ instructional delivery by helping them make the content more culturally
relevant for their all their students.
Relevance
This proposal provides qualitative evidence, over a period of two years, of the impact of a
community-based program/curriculum implemented during the junior year in college and
extended through the first two years of teaching. The proposal suggests what preservice
teachers are going to have to know in order to build better relationships with their
students and students’ families. The purpose of this session is to: 1) describe how a series
of community-based learning activities, completed during their preservice teacher
education experience, impacted beginning teachers’ practice two years later; 2) share a
model of community-based learning that was used in a seminar with preservice teachers;
3) encourage the use of community-based learning as an avenue of preservice teacher
preparation and as ongoing professional development and implementation for inservice
teach. [If we don’t, how will we know the impact of their learning, specifically their
multicultural education learning, received from IHEs?]
Moreover, articles have been written that share ways to close the widening academic gap;
however, few articles, as Sleeter (2001) notes, consider the home-community connection
as a way to raise and support academic achievement among African American students
and students of color. For preservice teachers to learn to make home-community


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