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University-District Partnerships: Linking Graduate Reading Programs to Professional Development for Impact on K-12 Reading Achievement.
Unformatted Document Text:  traditional, field-based expectations are described below with more specific descriptions of the programs provided in the next section of the proposal. One type of partnership is the professional development school (PDS). According to the Holmes Group (1990) a PDS is a school in which novice and experienced professionals can train, and in which research can be conducted to further the advancement of the teaching profession. A PDS shifts the teacher training focus from generic instruction before the teacher practicum into a partnership context between university programs and public schools. Factors that may contribute to the success of teachers who participate in these types of partnerships and teacher training programs are many. For example, these programs cultivate interdependence in teaching roles, provide time and space for collaboration, and establish communication structures that lead to analysis of teaching and learning. In addition, these programs provide access to technical expertise and cultivate leadership roles while allowing professionals to work within an environment that fosters respect and trust (Gebhard, 1998). Another type of partnership is the applied graduate education (AGE) model (Blackwell & Diez, 1998; 1999; Diez & Blackwell, 2001). A primary difference between the traditional and AGE program models is the involvement of university faculty and university-based coaches in the daily teaching practice of teachers’ K-12 students. Teachers are required to implement research based instructional approaches in their classrooms with the support of faculty and district teachers on special assignment. This presentation focuses on graduate teacher education models that are grounded in application experiences, one involving a PDS and the other an AGE program. C. Contribution Schools and Universities should take advantage of their alliances and extend them beyond traditional college-school partnerships, working together to develop highly qualified teachers. Participants will learn of two types of partnerships that can be established between IHEs and public schools, and how these programs can successfully include the support of the community. Brief summaries of these models follow below. The University has had a successful partnership with two professional development schools. Both are considered "high priority schools," with more than 90 percent of their P-5 students on a free/reduced lunch program. The Students and Tutors Achieving Reading Success (STARS) program was created in the fall of 2002. Candidates working towards a Masters in Reading and Exceptional Student Education (ESE) take courses at project development schools. These teachers are employed byt the public schools and teach in local area schools during the day. Instead of coming to the University to attend their classes, the professors teach at the local schools. Taking advantage of this arrangement, an after school family literacy program was created and linked to two courses that are part of the program’s requirements. The program includes parent education classes, Parent and Child Time activities (PACT), adult education classes (provided by the adult education office of the county), and tutoring for the participating children and their families. The university candidates tutor a small group of elementary public school students (2-3/tutor) twice weekly for an hour each session, and develop a complete portfolio for each group. The portfolio includes a complete assessment for each child (parent interviews, teacher interviews, health records, an analysis of the assessment results, an in-depth rationale for developing a reading program for the group, at least 10 weekly lesson plans with reflections, a final reflection, and samples of the children’s work). The parent education classes, adult education, and PACT activities take place on the same days after the tutoring sessions.

Authors: Pazos-Rego, Ana Maria. and Avalos, Mary.
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traditional, field-based expectations are described below with more specific descriptions
of the programs provided in the next section of the proposal.
One type of partnership is the professional development school (PDS). According
to the Holmes Group (1990) a PDS is a school in which novice and experienced
professionals can train, and in which research can be conducted to further the
advancement of the teaching profession. A PDS shifts the teacher training focus from
generic instruction before the teacher practicum into a partnership context between
university programs and public schools. Factors that may contribute to the success of
teachers who participate in these types of partnerships and teacher training programs are
many. For example, these programs cultivate interdependence in teaching roles, provide
time and space for collaboration, and establish communication structures that lead to
analysis of teaching and learning. In addition, these programs provide access to technical
expertise and cultivate leadership roles while allowing professionals to work within an
environment that fosters respect and trust (Gebhard, 1998).
Another type of partnership is the applied graduate education (AGE) model
(Blackwell & Diez, 1998; 1999; Diez & Blackwell, 2001). A primary difference between
the traditional and AGE program models is the involvement of university faculty and
university-based coaches in the daily teaching practice of teachers’ K-12 students.
Teachers are required to implement research based instructional approaches in their
classrooms with the support of faculty and district teachers on special assignment. This
presentation focuses on graduate teacher education models that are grounded in
application experiences, one involving a PDS and the other an AGE program.
C. Contribution
Schools and Universities should take advantage of their alliances and extend them
beyond traditional college-school partnerships, working together to develop highly
qualified teachers. Participants will learn of two types of partnerships that can be
established between IHEs and public schools, and how these programs can successfully
include the support of the community. Brief summaries of these models follow below.
The University has had a successful partnership with two professional
development schools. Both are considered "high priority schools," with more than 90
percent of their P-5 students on a free/reduced lunch program. The Students and Tutors
Achieving Reading Success (STARS) program was created in the fall of 2002.
Candidates working towards a Masters in Reading and Exceptional Student Education
(ESE) take courses at project development schools. These teachers are employed byt the
public schools and teach in local area schools during the day. Instead of coming to the
University to attend their classes, the professors teach at the local schools.
Taking advantage of this arrangement, an after school family literacy program
was created and linked to two courses that are part of the program’s requirements. The
program includes parent education classes, Parent and Child Time activities (PACT),
adult education classes (provided by the adult education office of the county), and
tutoring for the participating children and their families. The university candidates tutor a
small group of elementary public school students (2-3/tutor) twice weekly for an hour
each session, and develop a complete portfolio for each group. The portfolio includes a
complete assessment for each child (parent interviews, teacher interviews, health records,
an analysis of the assessment results, an in-depth rationale for developing a reading
program for the group, at least 10 weekly lesson plans with reflections, a final reflection,
and samples of the children’s work). The parent education classes, adult education, and
PACT activities take place on the same days after the tutoring sessions.


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