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Preparing Preservice Teachers to Teach Students Who are at Risk for Mathematics Disabilities: Evidence-Based Practices for Early Mathematics Instruction
Unformatted Document Text:  06AACTE proposal 1 AACTE 2006 Proposal Section I Statement of the Issue & Literature Review At the beginning of the 21 st century, there are no more critical or fundamental issues in education than beginning reading and mathematics skills. The importance of ensuring that children acquire adequate literacy and mathematics skills in the primary grades has been well documented: (a) students are at higher risk for academic failure and school drop-out than children who develop proficient skills in the first years of formal schooling, and (b) they are at increased risk for referral and placement in special education. There now exists an extensive knowledge base on the critical elements of reading instruction that must be provided to children in the earliest school years in order to ensure that they develop adequate academic skills. This body of knowledge has been integrated into many teacher preparation reading classes. Less is known about the critical elements of effective early mathematics instruction for at risk children. Evidence of the need for early identification of children at risk for mathematics failure comes from data on the progress of children who are identified – typically after one or two years of failure - as having a mathematics related disability and are provided with special education services. According to a recent report published by the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS, 2001), approximately 60 percent of students are identified too late to derive full benefit. The long-term consequences of late identification cannot be underestimated. For example, at present, only two percent of students receiving special or compensatory education for difficulties learning mathematics will complete a four-year college program. Research has shown that 5% to 8% of school-age children exhibit some form of mathematics disabilities that often go undetected until students attempt higher order thinking mathematics skills, such as algebra. Without early identification and remediation, many students with mathematics difficulties will not develop a level of mathematics proficiency that is sufficient to be successful on high stakes assessments. There is a need to prepare preservice teachers in elementary certification programs to work effectively with students who are at risk for mathematics disabilities. These teachers are the first line of intervention for students who are struggling with early mathematics skills. They must be prepared to offer appropriate instruction to meet the needs of these students. ContributionStrand Focus This proposal addresses Strand I by presenting information that responds to the question “How can colleges prepare teachers to respond to the NCLB mandate of implementing evidence-based practices and monitoring student performance?” Purpose & Relevance The purpose of this presentation is to provide the audience with an overview of evidence-based mathematics practices that can be integrated into typical mathematics instruction. The ADAPT framework will be presented as a tool that teachers can employ to provide appropriate instruction for all students. Evidenced-based exemplary practices

Authors: Bryant, Diane. and Bryant, Brian.
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06AACTE proposal
1
AACTE 2006 Proposal
Section I
Statement of the Issue & Literature Review
At the beginning of the 21
st
century, there are no more critical or fundamental
issues in education than beginning reading and mathematics skills. The importance of
ensuring that children acquire adequate literacy and mathematics skills in the primary
grades has been well documented: (a) students are at higher risk for academic failure and
school drop-out than children who develop proficient skills in the first years of formal
schooling, and (b) they are at increased risk for referral and placement in special
education. There now exists an extensive knowledge base on the critical elements of
reading instruction that must be provided to children in the earliest school years in order
to ensure that they develop adequate academic skills. This body of knowledge has been
integrated into many teacher preparation reading classes. Less is known about the critical
elements of effective early mathematics instruction for at risk children.
Evidence of the need for early identification of children at risk for mathematics
failure comes from data on the progress of children who are identified – typically after
one or two years of failure - as having a mathematics related disability and are provided
with special education services. According to a recent report published by the Office of
Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS, 2001), approximately 60 percent
of students are identified too late to derive full benefit. The long-term consequences of
late identification cannot be underestimated. For example, at present, only two percent of
students receiving special or compensatory education for difficulties learning
mathematics will complete a four-year college program.
Research has shown that 5% to 8% of school-age children exhibit some form of
mathematics disabilities that often go undetected until students attempt higher order
thinking mathematics skills, such as algebra. Without early identification and
remediation, many students with mathematics difficulties will not develop a level of
mathematics proficiency that is sufficient to be successful on high stakes assessments.
There is a need to prepare preservice teachers in elementary certification
programs to work effectively with students who are at risk for mathematics disabilities.
These teachers are the first line of intervention for students who are struggling with early
mathematics skills. They must be prepared to offer appropriate instruction to meet the
needs of these students.
Contribution
Strand Focus
This proposal addresses Strand I by presenting information that responds to the
question “How can colleges prepare teachers to respond to the NCLB mandate of
implementing evidence-based practices and monitoring student performance?”
Purpose & Relevance
The purpose of this presentation is to provide the audience with an overview of
evidence-based mathematics practices that can be integrated into typical mathematics
instruction. The ADAPT framework will be presented as a tool that teachers can employ
to provide appropriate instruction for all students. Evidenced-based exemplary practices


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