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Building Alliances to Support Beginning Teachers Through an Electronic Network
Unformatted Document Text:  C. Contributions Schools, colleges, and departments of education (SCDEs) continuing to support their graduates in their first years of teaching provides potential benefits to school systems, novice teachers and to the SCDEs themselves. Such support may help address the challenge of retaining new teachers by providing a more coherent system of professional development for teachers from pre-service education through induction. In addition, alliances with graduates will enable SCDEs to collect evidence on the performance of their graduates and obtain feedback on the effectiveness of their pre-service programs, increasing accountability and transparency of their practices. Developing alliances and relationships with our colleagues in other parts of the university, such as the Alumni Office, Center for Academic Technology, and Arts and Sciences, as well as with schools, can be beneficial for all concerned and can help strengthen our programs and our services to our graduates. New technologies, such as electronic networks, can be utilized to support graduates from different geographic areas, enable new teachers to develop collegial relationships with their former classmates, and provide exchanges among beginning teachers in a wide range of school settings, thus giving new teachers access to perspectives and contexts beyond those of the district in which they are employed. These kinds of forums could complement district-wide induction programs. As our students and our universities come more and more to rely on technology during their programs and as we want teachers to become more comfortable with integrating technology into the classroom, using electronic support networks will build on their skills and model the use of technology for lifelong learning. Based on our research and on our own data collection, we will share our findings about how we have built alliances to establish successful practices in university support of new graduates in the beginning years of teaching. D. Relevance In order to develop successful practices to provide needed supports for our graduates as they begin their teaching careers, we have been building and expanding alliances with entities both on and off campus. Evidence from data we have collected for the last few years has informed our practice. Using data from surveys distributed in practicum seminars, online surveys distributed to beginning teachers in various school systems and to our graduates using Survey Monkey, and surveys of participants in beginning teacher groups and events, we have developed a model for support which seems to meet the perceived needs of our graduates. This year this model has included a workshop on behavior management and the piloting of an electronic support network. In order to increase the likelihood that this model will be successful and to inform its evolution, we will analyze transcripts from the electronic network and continue to elicit and analyze data from our students, graduates, and participants. Our data will enable us to better understand how participation impacts teaching. E. Implications for Action

Authors: Bromfield, Marcia. and Deane, Harriet.
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C. Contributions
Schools, colleges, and departments of education (SCDEs) continuing to support their
graduates in their first years of teaching provides potential benefits to school systems,
novice teachers and to the SCDEs themselves. Such support may help address the
challenge of retaining new teachers by providing a more coherent system of professional
development for teachers from pre-service education through induction. In addition,
alliances with graduates will enable SCDEs to collect evidence on the performance of
their graduates and obtain feedback on the effectiveness of their pre-service programs,
increasing accountability and transparency of their practices. Developing alliances and
relationships with our colleagues in other parts of the university, such as the Alumni
Office, Center for Academic Technology, and Arts and Sciences, as well as with schools,
can be beneficial for all concerned and can help strengthen our programs and our services
to our graduates.
New technologies, such as electronic networks, can be utilized to support graduates from
different geographic areas, enable new teachers to develop collegial relationships with
their former classmates, and provide exchanges among beginning teachers in a wide
range of school settings, thus giving new teachers access to perspectives and contexts
beyond those of the district in which they are employed. These kinds of forums could
complement district-wide induction programs. As our students and our universities come
more and more to rely on technology during their programs and as we want teachers to
become more comfortable with integrating technology into the classroom, using
electronic support networks will build on their skills and model the use of technology for
lifelong learning. Based on our research and on our own data collection, we will share
our findings about how we have built alliances to establish successful practices in
university support of new graduates in the beginning years of teaching.
D. Relevance
In order to develop successful practices to provide needed supports for our graduates as
they begin their teaching careers, we have been building and expanding alliances with
entities both on and off campus. Evidence from data we have collected for the last few
years has informed our practice. Using data from surveys distributed in practicum
seminars, online surveys distributed to beginning teachers in various school systems and
to our graduates using Survey Monkey, and surveys of participants in beginning teacher
groups and events, we have developed a model for support which seems to meet the
perceived needs of our graduates. This year this model has included a workshop on
behavior management and the piloting of an electronic support network. In order to
increase the likelihood that this model will be successful and to inform its evolution, we
will analyze transcripts from the electronic network and continue to elicit and analyze
data from our students, graduates, and participants. Our data will enable us to better
understand how participation impacts teaching.
E. Implications for Action


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