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University and Public School Collaboration: Lessons Learned From Keeping it Simple
Unformatted Document Text:  service teacher to spend significant time spent in schools immersed in the daily routines is key to the developmental growth process of becoming a teacher (Guyton & McIntyre, 1990). Contribution: As budgets tighten and the pressures of “No Child” become greater, collaborative relationships between universities and public schools need to become more mutually beneficial and less stressful for all. The relationship should enhance pre-service teachers’ abilities to be effective in the public schools as well as provide a catalyst for the improvement of public school student performance. Our ongoing experience in this setting may provide other institutions a simple and effective method for enhancing collaborative relationships between universities and public schools. Relevance: Our experience may impact policy as we develop quantitative data relating to pre- service teacher work in the classroom as it relates to public school student achievement growth. In-service teacher practice may also change as they learn how to better use pre-service teachers in their classrooms. Our practice as pre-service trainers will also change as we develop ways to more effectively integrate our instruction into the daily practicum work that our students complete. Implication for Action: Our approach to pre-service training has evolved because of this relationship with the public schools. We have been able to develop more accountability and more accurate data collection as it relates to our pre-service students. Our students have developed the ability to become more confident and reflective teachers as a result of this experience. Graduation exit interviews consistently detail this experience as the most important semester of our entire program. Section II: Outcomes and Methods Learner/participant outcomes: We would like the participants in this session to have a detailed understanding of our collaborative relationship with the public schools in our area and how simple it has been to develop and cultivate that relationship with mutual advantages for all. We would also like to receive as much feedback as possible from the group so that we may analyze suggestions and possibly implement those changes into our process. Methods: This session will be completed in three parts. Each will be presented briefly with time for participant questions and input. Part one will look at current research and the structure of our collaboration. Part two will look at the benefits for public school students and pre-service students. Part three will summarize the process and develop further discussion. References Darling-Hammond, L. (1996). The quiet revolution: Rethinking teacher development. 2

Authors: Bowler, Gerald., Robinson, Kevin. and Harris, Genell.
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service teacher to spend significant time spent in schools immersed in the daily routines
is key to the developmental growth process of becoming a teacher (Guyton & McIntyre,
1990).
Contribution:
As budgets tighten and the pressures of “No Child” become greater, collaborative
relationships between universities and public schools need to become more mutually
beneficial and less stressful for all. The relationship should enhance pre-service teachers’
abilities to be effective in the public schools as well as provide a catalyst for the
improvement of public school student performance. Our ongoing experience in this
setting may provide other institutions a simple and effective method for enhancing
collaborative relationships between universities and public schools.
Relevance:
Our experience may impact policy as we develop quantitative data relating to pre-
service teacher work in the classroom as it relates to public school student achievement
growth. In-service teacher practice may also change as they learn how to better use pre-
service teachers in their classrooms. Our practice as pre-service trainers will also change
as we develop ways to more effectively integrate our instruction into the daily practicum
work that our students complete.
Implication for Action:
Our approach to pre-service training has evolved because of this relationship with
the public schools. We have been able to develop more accountability and more accurate
data collection as it relates to our pre-service students. Our students have developed the
ability to become more confident and reflective teachers as a result of this experience.
Graduation exit interviews consistently detail this experience as the most important
semester of our entire program.
Section II: Outcomes and Methods
Learner/participant outcomes:
We would like the participants in this session to have a detailed understanding of
our collaborative relationship with the public schools in our area and how simple it has
been to develop and cultivate that relationship with mutual advantages for all. We would
also like to receive as much feedback as possible from the group so that we may analyze
suggestions and possibly implement those changes into our process.
Methods:
This session will be completed in three parts. Each will be presented briefly with
time for participant questions and input. Part one will look at current research and the
structure of our collaboration. Part two will look at the benefits for public school
students and pre-service students. Part three will summarize the process and develop
further discussion.
References
Darling-Hammond, L. (1996). The quiet revolution: Rethinking teacher development.
2


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