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HQT Status: Does it Really Improve Collaboration?
Unformatted Document Text:  Statement of the issue: The purpose of this presentation is to report a research study conducted with early childhood and special education teachers enrolled in graduate school addressing how or if highly qualified teacher status affects collaboration in school settings. The results of this study will enable teacher educators to better understand “real life” issues affecting blockades to cooperation among and between teachers, to design effective models of collaboration for students of education to follow, and to add to the research base on teacher quality. Literature review: In 2001, when President George W. Bush signed the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, it established greater accountability for student progress in all fifty states. A multi-pronged approach to a multifaceted problem, NCLB not only addressed accountability issues, but also granted increased parental choice and local flexibility in designing strategies within broad directives and timelines. A significant proviso of the legislation was that all teachers of core academic subjects be “highly qualified” by the end of the 2005-2006 school year (U.S. Department of Education, 2003). These efforts have raised questions as well as expectations for early childhood and special education. The No Child Left Behind Act supports early learning (e.g., the Reading First provision) and the special needs of some children, but contains little about collaboration except between teachers and administrators or agencies. In his speech at Butterfield Jr. High School in Van Buren, Arkansas, for instance, President Bush stated that it is essential to “get it right” with our youngest students in order to assure their future success (2004). In the same speech, the president recognized, “We’re making sure that the progress of special education students is judged by standards appropriate to their development” (2004). Though not viewed in NCLB as vital, collaboration between early childhood and special educators has been recognized as important in the field and in the literature. Contribution: This presentation supports the theme of this year’s conference, “Creating New Visions for Teacher Education” by revealing candid comments of early childhood and special education teachers regarding the Highly Qualified Teacher requirements as it relates to them and their colleagues’ collaborative attempts to raise student achievement. The problem addressed in this study is whether highly qualified teacher status advances collaborative efforts between early childhood and special educators. This presentation will provide a review of the literature focusing on the No Child Left Behind and Highly Qualified Teacher (HQT) requirements as well as the evidence supporting collaboration between early childhood and special education. The research conducted to investigate the stated problem will be described, findings shared, implications reported, and suggestions made for future study. Relevance: 1

Authors: Harper, Cynthia., Owens, Lynetta. and KIng, Nina.
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Statement of the issue:
The purpose of this presentation is to report a research study conducted with early
childhood and special education teachers enrolled in graduate school addressing how or if
highly qualified teacher status affects collaboration in school settings. The results of this
study will enable teacher educators to better understand “real life” issues affecting
blockades to cooperation among and between teachers, to design effective models of
collaboration for students of education to follow, and to add to the research base on
teacher quality.
Literature review:
In 2001, when President George W. Bush signed the No Child Left Behind (NCLB)
Act, it established greater accountability for student progress in all fifty states. A multi-
pronged approach to a multifaceted problem, NCLB not only addressed accountability
issues, but also granted increased parental choice and local flexibility in designing
strategies within broad directives and timelines. A significant proviso of the legislation
was that all teachers of core academic subjects be “highly qualified” by the end of the
2005-2006 school year (U.S. Department of Education, 2003). These efforts have raised
questions as well as expectations for early childhood and special education.
The No Child Left Behind Act supports early learning (e.g., the Reading First
provision) and the special needs of some children, but contains little about collaboration
except between teachers and administrators or agencies. In his speech at Butterfield Jr.
High School in Van Buren, Arkansas, for instance, President Bush stated that it is
essential to “get it right” with our youngest students in order to assure their future success
(2004). In the same speech, the president recognized, “We’re making sure that the
progress of special education students is judged by standards appropriate to their
development” (2004). Though not viewed in NCLB as vital, collaboration between early
childhood and special educators has been recognized as important in the field and in the
literature.
Contribution:
This presentation supports the theme of this year’s conference, “Creating New
Visions for Teacher Education” by revealing candid comments of early childhood and
special education teachers regarding the Highly Qualified Teacher requirements as it
relates to them and their colleagues’ collaborative attempts to raise student achievement.
The problem addressed in this study is whether highly qualified teacher status
advances collaborative efforts between early childhood and special educators. This
presentation will provide a review of the literature focusing on the No Child Left Behind
and Highly Qualified Teacher (HQT) requirements as well as the evidence supporting
collaboration between early childhood and special education. The research conducted to
investigate the stated problem will be described, findings shared, implications reported,
and suggestions made for future study.
Relevance:
1


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