All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Encountering the "Other": M.Ed. Preservice Teachers Explore Reading Strategies With English Language Learners.
Unformatted Document Text:  PROPOSAL, AACTE Annual Meeting, 2006 Encountering the “Other”: M.Ed. preservice teachers exploring reading strategies with English language learners planning confirmed that for many of our students this was an eye-opening and life changing experience. Relevance This partnership with the campus-based but independent language institute was of benefit to both institutions. The language students got personalized reading tutoring and I (the practicum course instructor), along with the M.Ed. student teachers I consider “co-researchers,” used qualitative methods and participant inquiry to collect direct experiential reports that enhanced our understanding of the reality of ELLs in their classrooms. Imagining these future teachers in their classroom with little time to provide one-on-one help to learners struggling with reading is cause for worry about how we are preparing our future teachers to be successful with learners from diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds. This experience was a chance to engage with the issue on a deeper than rational level. It gave the M.Ed. students a valuable opportunity over an extended time period to see individual reading strategies in action (or not), and try to teach them as needed. They also learned something about a new culture, and got to know individually and collectively the specific real needs of language learners. Implication for Action My first and overriding objective for this presentation is that participants will go away with the information and inspiration necessary to replicate this project in their teacher education programs. I would like to share the details and results of what I found to be a powerful learning tool for myself, my student teachers, and the foreign language speakers with whom they worked. We research and talk about multiculturalism, and realize the importance of educating student teachers to understand English Language Learners, but, ultimately, “experience is the best teacher.” II. Outcomes and Methods A: Learner/Participant Outcomes: This paper concerns a simple consciousness-raising project that was incorporated into an existing practicum course (of a 36-credit M.Ed. program leading to certification) in a way that allowed us to meet three main objectives simultaneously: 1. Get to know, one-on-one and for an “extended” period (ten weeks) a student whose first language was not English and who was trying to study in an English classroom. 2. Experiment with the reading strategies they were learning about in a reading methods course during that same semester on an individual basis with one student. 3. Practice the lesson planning, reflection, revision cycle on a small scale. But the most important goal was to provide an authentic, one-on-one interaction with diverse students. As a result of this session, I hope we will generate ideas about what can be done in our individual contexts. I hope to give enough information to facilitate the replication of this experience. B: Methods: After a brief participatory activity to focus the discussion on the reality of language learners in our classrooms, and the vital importance of working an awareness of ELLs’ needs into everything we do, I will describe the partners, details, design, implementation, and roadblocks of the experience. I will provide hand-outs that will help participants to replicate it. Along with a description of the “how-to,” I will share results in the form of student reflections. There will be time at the end for question and answer. [This project was carried out under IRB approval and was unfunded.] 3

Authors: Kiss, Katherine.
first   previous   Page 3 of 5   next   last



background image
PROPOSAL, AACTE Annual Meeting, 2006
Encountering the “Other”:
M.Ed. preservice teachers exploring reading strategies with English language learners
planning confirmed that for many of our students this was an eye-opening and life changing
experience.
Relevance
This partnership with the campus-based but independent language institute was of benefit
to both institutions. The language students got personalized reading tutoring and I (the practicum
course instructor), along with the M.Ed. student teachers I consider “co-researchers,” used
qualitative methods and participant inquiry to collect direct experiential reports that enhanced
our understanding of the reality of ELLs in their classrooms. Imagining these future teachers in
their classroom with little time to provide one-on-one help to learners struggling with reading is
cause for worry about how we are preparing our future teachers to be successful with learners
from diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds. This experience was a chance to engage with
the issue on a deeper than rational level. It gave the M.Ed. students a valuable opportunity over
an extended time period to see individual reading strategies in action (or not), and try to teach
them as needed. They also learned something about a new culture, and got to know individually
and collectively the specific real needs of language learners.
Implication for Action
My first and overriding objective for this presentation is that participants will go away
with the information and inspiration necessary to replicate this project in their teacher education
programs. I would like to share the details and results of what I found to be a powerful learning
tool for myself, my student teachers, and the foreign language speakers with whom they worked.
We research and talk about multiculturalism, and realize the importance of educating student
teachers to understand English Language Learners, but, ultimately, “experience is the best
teacher.”
II.
Outcomes and Methods
A: Learner/Participant Outcomes: This paper concerns a simple consciousness-raising project
that was incorporated into an existing practicum course (of a 36-credit M.Ed. program leading to
certification) in a way that allowed us to meet three main objectives simultaneously:
1. Get to know, one-on-one and for an “extended” period (ten weeks) a student whose first
language was not English and who was trying to study in an English classroom.
2. Experiment with the reading strategies they were learning about in a reading methods
course during that same semester on an individual basis with one student.
3. Practice the lesson planning, reflection, revision cycle on a small scale.
But the most important goal was to provide an authentic, one-on-one interaction with
diverse students. As a result of this session, I hope we will generate ideas about what can be done
in our individual contexts. I hope to give enough information to facilitate the replication of this
experience.
B: Methods: After a brief participatory activity to focus the discussion on the reality of language
learners in our classrooms, and the vital importance of working an awareness of ELLs’ needs
into everything we do, I will describe the partners, details, design, implementation, and
roadblocks of the experience. I will provide hand-outs that will help participants to replicate it.
Along with a description of the “how-to,” I will share results in the form of student reflections.
There will be time at the end for question and answer.
[This project was carried out under IRB approval and was unfunded.]
3


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 5   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.