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Paving the Way for E-Portfolio: Transitioning Faculty from Paper to Digital
Unformatted Document Text:  The candidate portfolio, developed with appropriate instructor guidance, offers teacher education students the opportunity to consolidate all the aspects of their learning experiences together into one succinct, comprehensive package Portfolios also offer learners the opportunity to reflect on their work, knowledge acquisition process and self-directed growth, while helping students build the self-review habits necessary for good teaching (Wolf & Dietz 1998). Portfolios encourage collaborative dialogue, enriched discussions of teaching, and allow documentation of growth over time, while taking in consideration each student’s diverse experiences and their integration within their personal teaching preparation experiences. (Kaye and Morin, 1998). Throughout the portfolio development process, candidates develop marketable technical skills as they reflect on their own strengths and weaknesses (Kilbane & McNergeny, 2001). In terms of assessment, portfolios can provide instructors with a mechanism to view a comprehensive account of the student’s work and educational growth over a period of time (Shulman 1988). According to Wolf (1996) portfolios can be used effectively to assess student’s performance: Although portfolios can be time consuming to construct and cumbersome to review, they can also capture the complexities of professional practice in ways no other approach can. Not only are they an effective way to assess teaching quality, but they can also provide teachers with opportunities for self-reflection and collegial interactions based on documented episodes of their own teaching” (p.34) Preliminary application of portfolios suggests an improvement in teacher training evaluation, and in practice, guides the pre-service candidate’s professional development. Teaching educators have found that well-constructed portfolios may help capture the complexities of acquiring knowledge, teaching, and learning to become an educator when used as authentic assessment tools within courses and programs in Colleges of Education (Carroll, Pothoff, & Huber, 1996; McLaughlin & Vogt, 1996; McKinney, Perkins & Jones, 1995. Kenneth Wolfe (1991) suggests that portfolios “make it possible to document the unfolding of both teaching and learning over time” (p.129). Portfolios themselves may foster an inquiry approach that shifts ownership and responsibility of actual learning over to the learner (Graves & Sustein, 1992). The utilization of portfolios offers the potential to improve the teacher education process on several levels. First, they enable program/faculty to assess a students’ progress in developing the complex skills necessary for effective teaching practices (Barton & Collins, 1993; Mokhtari et al., 1996; Robbins et al., 1996). Second, portfolios serve to clarify, reinforce, and evaluate attainment of a program’s goal (Carroll, Potthoff, & Huber, 1996). Finally, portfolios reflect a national trend towards performance assessment in career placement as well as serving as a vehicle for demonstrating competency with regard to national and state teaching standards (Carroll, Potthoff, & Huber, 1996). Performance-based assessment practices in general, have been developed in response to the growing concern among educators that traditional assessment practices were not meeting the specific learning needs of students. By involving candidates as stakeholders in the assessment process and focusing the assessment on student learning, educators have made strides toward designing high quality, authentic assessment instruments. ContributionPresenters will share the learning process involved in converting from paper to electronic portfolios. The technology incorporated into electronic portfolios provides a vitally important framework for displaying the multiple literacy skills of candidates, and the technological skills

Authors: Schween, Dorothy. and Sivakumaran, Thilla.
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The candidate portfolio, developed with appropriate instructor guidance, offers teacher
education students the opportunity to consolidate all the aspects of their learning
experiences together into one succinct, comprehensive package
Portfolios also offer learners the opportunity to reflect on their work, knowledge acquisition
process and self-directed growth, while helping students build the self-review habits necessary
for good teaching (Wolf & Dietz 1998). Portfolios encourage collaborative dialogue, enriched
discussions of teaching, and allow documentation of growth over time, while taking in
consideration each student’s diverse experiences and their integration within their personal
teaching preparation experiences. (Kaye and Morin, 1998). Throughout the portfolio
development process, candidates develop marketable technical skills as they reflect on their own
strengths and weaknesses (Kilbane & McNergeny, 2001).
In terms of assessment, portfolios can provide instructors with a mechanism to view a
comprehensive account of the student’s work and educational growth over a period of time
(Shulman 1988). According to Wolf (1996) portfolios can be used effectively to assess
student’s performance:
Although portfolios can be time consuming to construct and cumbersome to review, they
can also capture the complexities of professional practice in ways no other approach can.
Not only are they an effective way to assess teaching quality, but they can also provide
teachers with opportunities for self-reflection and collegial interactions based on
documented episodes of their own teaching” (p.34)
Preliminary application of portfolios suggests an improvement in teacher training evaluation, and
in practice, guides the pre-service candidate’s professional development. Teaching educators
have found that well-constructed portfolios may help capture the complexities of acquiring
knowledge, teaching, and learning to become an educator when used as authentic assessment
tools within courses and programs in Colleges of Education (Carroll, Pothoff, & Huber, 1996;
McLaughlin & Vogt, 1996; McKinney, Perkins & Jones, 1995. Kenneth Wolfe (1991) suggests
that portfolios “make it possible to document the unfolding of both teaching and learning over
time” (p.129). Portfolios themselves may foster an inquiry approach that shifts ownership and
responsibility of actual learning over to the learner (Graves & Sustein, 1992).
The utilization of portfolios offers the potential to improve the teacher education process on
several levels. First, they enable program/faculty to assess a students’ progress in developing the
complex skills necessary for effective teaching practices (Barton & Collins, 1993; Mokhtari et
al., 1996; Robbins et al., 1996). Second, portfolios serve to clarify, reinforce, and evaluate
attainment of a program’s goal (Carroll, Potthoff, & Huber, 1996). Finally, portfolios reflect a
national trend towards performance assessment in career placement as well as serving as a
vehicle for demonstrating competency with regard to national and state teaching standards
(Carroll, Potthoff, & Huber, 1996).
Performance-based assessment practices in general, have been developed in response to the
growing concern among educators that traditional assessment practices were not meeting the
specific learning needs of students. By involving candidates as stakeholders in the assessment
process and focusing the assessment on student learning, educators have made strides toward
designing high quality, authentic assessment instruments.
Contribution
Presenters will share the learning process involved in converting from paper to electronic
portfolios. The technology incorporated into electronic portfolios provides a vitally important
framework for displaying the multiple literacy skills of candidates, and the technological skills


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