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Paving the Way for E-Portfolio: Transitioning Faculty from Paper to Digital
Unformatted Document Text:  discussed in this presentation will be clearly tied to effective instructor practice. In order to guide candidates through the development and refinement of technology skills, education faculty are challenged to continually remain abreast of new techniques through professional development, adjusted practice, and increased recognition of their own accountability. As supported by research quoted in the Literature Review, the electronic portfolio serves to increase the accountability of both the education faculty and the candidates while providing diverse venues for showcasing performance.RelevanceThis presentation demonstrates how in-house qualitative and quantitative survey data served to identify faculty professional development needs and resulted in the design faculty workshops to promote effective portfolio development practices. As more and more universities move toward implementation of electronic portfolios, faculty challenges that our university has already experienced will be encountered. Survey results and the subsequent action plan created by ULM will apprise participants of some of the obstacles that are not apparent when initially investigating either commercial programs or developing their own approach to electronic portfolio and data systems. Information gained from survey results may inform administrators of the types of support and resources that are necessary to successfully make the transition to an electronic system.Implication for ActionBased upon the survey results, two types of workshops will be offered to faculty. Large-group workshops will address functionalities that have not yet been utilized, while small-group, individualized workshops will be offered to personalize the learning process for those who are less comfortable with the transition process. Additional tactics include an outline of administrative responsibilities and provision of on-line resources. Section II: Outcomes and Methods Learner/Participant OutcomesParticipants will: • Gain a clearer understanding of the challenges involved in the electronic portfolio transition process • Recognize the types of support and resources necessary for effective implementation • Identify facilitative professional development components • Become aware of scheduling issues and proposed solutions MethodsPresenters will provide participants with an individual paper to augment the interactive PowerPoint presentation and discussion on the topic. Information will be presented in three parts: background; survey data and analysis; and action plan. References Anderson, R.S. & DeMeulle, L. (1998). Portfolio use in twenty-four teacher education programs. Teacher Education Quarterly. 25(1), 23-31. Barton, J. & Collins, A. (1993). Portfolios in teacher education. Journal of Teacher Education. 44, 200-211. Carroll, J.A., Potthoff, D. & Huber, T. (1996). Learnings from three years of portfolio use in teacher education. Journal of Teacher Education. 47(4), 253-262. Graves, D. & Sunstein, B. ((1992). Portfolio Portraits. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Authors: Schween, Dorothy. and Sivakumaran, Thilla.
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discussed in this presentation will be clearly tied to effective instructor practice. In order to guide
candidates through the development and refinement of technology skills, education faculty are
challenged to continually remain abreast of new techniques through professional development,
adjusted practice, and increased recognition of their own accountability. As supported by
research quoted in the Literature Review, the electronic portfolio serves to increase the
accountability of both the education faculty and the candidates while providing diverse venues
for showcasing performance.
Relevance
This presentation demonstrates how in-house qualitative and quantitative survey data served to
identify faculty professional development needs and resulted in the design faculty workshops to
promote effective portfolio development practices. As more and more universities move toward
implementation of electronic portfolios, faculty challenges that our university has already
experienced will be encountered. Survey results and the subsequent action plan created by ULM
will apprise participants of some of the obstacles that are not apparent when initially
investigating either commercial programs or developing their own approach to electronic
portfolio and data systems. Information gained from survey results may inform administrators of
the types of support and resources that are necessary to successfully make the transition to an
electronic system.
Implication for Action
Based upon the survey results, two types of workshops will be offered to faculty. Large-group
workshops will address functionalities that have not yet been utilized, while small-group,
individualized workshops will be offered to personalize the learning process for those who are
less comfortable with the transition process. Additional tactics include an outline of
administrative responsibilities and provision of on-line resources.
Section II: Outcomes and Methods
Learner/Participant Outcomes
Participants will:
Gain a clearer understanding of the challenges involved in the electronic portfolio
transition process
Recognize the types of support and resources necessary for effective implementation
Identify facilitative professional development components
Become aware of scheduling issues and proposed solutions
Methods
Presenters will provide participants with an individual paper to augment the interactive
PowerPoint presentation and discussion on the topic. Information will be presented in three parts:
background; survey data and analysis; and action plan.
References
Anderson, R.S. & DeMeulle, L. (1998). Portfolio use in twenty-four teacher education programs.
Teacher Education Quarterly. 25(1), 23-31.
Barton, J. & Collins, A. (1993). Portfolios in teacher education. Journal of Teacher
Education. 44, 200-211.
Carroll, J.A., Potthoff, D. & Huber, T. (1996). Learnings from three years of portfolio
use in teacher education. Journal of Teacher Education. 47(4), 253-262.
Graves, D. & Sunstein, B. ((1992). Portfolio Portraits. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.


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