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Unlocking Classroom Doors: Making Teaching and Learning Public
Unformatted Document Text:  between the university professor and Title I coordinator has led to other projects supporting professional development such as grant writing and exploring ways to develop cultural competence both among the school personnel and preservice teachers. In a third model, the university professor and a graduate student/ teacher in literacy learning worked together to coordinate campus learning opportunities with a study group, led by the graduate student. Pre-service teachers also observed in the graduate student’s classroom. Pre-service students were then able to see the connection between literacy best practices they were learning in class with best practice in as seen in the teacher/graduate student’s classroom. Lastly, we will examine a weekly after school support group that was set up for preservice and beginning teachers working in highly diverse school settings where multiple languages were spoken by students and their families. The purpose is to encourage these teachers to engage in reflective practice by participating in an ongoing dialogue about puzzling situations and dilemmas they encounter in their classroom teaching. Benefits of the support group have been to promote the growth of these participants as reflective practitioners as well as to nurture them as culturally responsive teachers. These examples illustrate the significance of collaboration, reflection and dialogue that inspires greater confidence in decision-making, competence in theory to practice, advocacy and eventually leadership for preservice and inservice teachers. These examples examine multi-language classrooms, literacy and learning, cultural competence and social justice, and collaborative endeavors. D. Relevance: The round-table discussion will provide a forum for examining the environments in which teachers can take on leadership roles in curriculum change and policy development that may lead to educational reform. The examples of successful endeavors given will be a catalyst for discussion of best practice and change. E. Implication for Actions: Future actions might include: • College credit given for engaging in a process of discussion, reflection and collaboration • Setting up forums in which preservice and inservice teachers can dialogue about “real- life” classroom experiences which have implications for leadership and professional development • Researching the benefits of having two or more preservice teachers share a classroom during their first practicum sessions. Section II: Outcomes and Methods A. Learner/participant outcomes: In this round-table session we will discuss the four endeavors of partnerships, including benefits and hurdles each endeavor presents. These collaborative endeavors include pre- and in-service teachers, graduate students, and university professors. This rich blend of levels of learning may encourage other teacher education programs to rethink leadership opportunities for all participants. B. Methods:

Authors: Gatimu, Wangeci., Reynolds, Mary., Myers, Chloe. and Dauer, Sue.
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between the university professor and Title I coordinator has led to other projects
supporting professional development such as grant writing and exploring ways to develop
cultural competence both among the school personnel and preservice teachers. In a third
model, the university professor and a graduate student/ teacher in literacy learning
worked together to coordinate campus learning opportunities with a study group, led by
the graduate student. Pre-service teachers also observed in the graduate student’s
classroom. Pre-service students were then able to see the connection between literacy
best practices they were learning in class with best practice in as seen in the
teacher/graduate student’s classroom. Lastly, we will examine a weekly after school
support group that was set up for preservice and beginning teachers working in highly
diverse school settings where multiple languages were spoken by students and their
families. The purpose is to encourage these teachers to engage in reflective practice by
participating in an ongoing dialogue about puzzling situations and dilemmas they
encounter in their classroom teaching. Benefits of the support group have been to
promote the growth of these participants as reflective practitioners as well as to nurture
them as culturally responsive teachers.
These examples illustrate the significance of collaboration, reflection and dialogue
that inspires greater confidence in decision-making, competence in theory to practice,
advocacy and eventually leadership for preservice and inservice teachers. These
examples examine multi-language classrooms, literacy and learning, cultural competence
and social justice, and collaborative endeavors.
D. Relevance:
The round-table discussion will provide a forum for examining the environments in
which teachers can take on leadership roles in curriculum change and policy development
that may lead to educational reform. The examples of successful endeavors given will be
a catalyst for discussion of best practice and change.
E. Implication for Actions:
Future actions might include:
• College credit given for engaging in a process of discussion, reflection and
collaboration
• Setting up forums in which preservice and inservice teachers can dialogue about “real-
life” classroom experiences which have implications for leadership and professional
development
• Researching the benefits of having two or more preservice teachers share a classroom
during their first practicum sessions.
Section II: Outcomes and Methods
A. Learner/participant outcomes:
In this round-table session we will discuss the four endeavors of partnerships, including
benefits and hurdles each endeavor presents. These collaborative endeavors include pre-
and in-service teachers, graduate students, and university professors. This rich blend of
levels of learning may encourage other teacher education programs to rethink leadership
opportunities for all participants.
B. Methods:


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