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Preparing Future Teachers of Reading: Create a Lasting Literacy by Developing Minds and Bringing Life Into Learning
Unformatted Document Text:  in the national Language Arts Standards or state teacher education standards, with one notable exception, Marzano’s article on “Teaching Thinking” in the Handbook of Research in the English Language Arts (in Flood, et al., 1994). The critical thinking agenda is nicely laid out in Developing Minds: A Resource Book for Teaching Thinking (Costa 1985; 2001). The critical thinking agenda was linked to the teaching of Reading and the Language Arts tangentially through the inclusion of a section on teaching thinking across the curriculum, which included Carol Booth Olson’s (1985) article, “The Thinking/Writing Connection” (p. 102-107) and Beau Fly’s (1985) article, “Reading and “Thinking” (p. 108-113) and a second section on programs to teach thinking, which included Howard Wills’s (1985) article “Great Books” (p. 233) and Carol Booth Olson’s “The California Writing Project” (215-219. Today the lifelong learning agenda is best articulated in publications of the organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD, 1998). The recent summary report of the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), aptly entitled, “Literacy in an Information Age” and another publication that included Sample Tasks from the PISA 200 Assessment highlight the need to revisit the need for lifelong learning and for critical thinking in light of contemporary circumstances. Literacy in the Information Age, the final report from the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), a large-scale cooperative effort of governments, research institutions, and the Organization of Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), coordinated by Statistics Canada and the Educational Testing Service of Princeton, New Jersey, presents evidence that literacy proficiency affects the quality and flexibility of work, enhanced career opportunities, higher income and public and civic involvement. Today, adults need to be able to possess prose, document, and quantitative literacy. The PISA assessment assesses students’ reading literacy, mathematical literacy, and scientific literacy, which require an understanding of and facility with the methods and processes pertinent to private use, public use, work, and education. Both publications discuss the rationale for expanding literacy to include the dimension of higher-level thinking and the various domains of life in knowledge-based society. Globalization and the emergence of the knowledge-based society are two main features of the economic paradigm at the start of the 21 st century. The two processes are taking place simultaneously. Advances in science and technology have increased the reach and speed of communication and reduced costs. In turn, the technological advances have contributed to the internationalization of production and financial markets (OECD, p. 2. Globalization refers to the growing economic interdependency among countries and firms through increased trade, foreign investment, international sourcing of production inputs and inter-firm alliances (OECD, p. 2). Technological change is playing a vital role in the globalization process. Through their effects on production methods, consumption patterns and the structure of economies, information and communication (ITCs) are a key factor in the transition to the knowledge-based economy (OECD) (p. 3) The themes highlighted in OECD publications are reiterated by the authors who contributed to Developing Minds: A Resource Book for Teaching Thinking (Costa, 2001). Costa reconstructed the lifelong learning vision: Our world has shifted away from an industrial model of society to a learning society, from Newtonian to quantum sciences, and from a linear to a complex and

Authors: Rearick, Mary.
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in the national Language Arts Standards or state teacher education standards, with one
notable exception, Marzano’s article on “Teaching Thinking” in the Handbook of
Research in
the English Language Arts (in Flood, et al., 1994). The critical thinking
agenda is nicely laid out in Developing Minds: A Resource Book for Teaching Thinking
(Costa 1985; 2001). The critical thinking agenda was linked to the teaching of Reading
and the Language Arts tangentially through the inclusion of a section on teaching
thinking across the curriculum, which included Carol Booth Olson’s (1985) article, “The
Thinking/Writing Connection” (p. 102-107) and Beau Fly’s (1985) article, “Reading and
“Thinking” (p. 108-113) and a second section on programs to teach thinking, which
included Howard Wills’s (1985) article “Great Books” (p. 233) and Carol Booth Olson’s
“The California Writing Project” (215-219.
Today the lifelong learning agenda is best articulated in publications of the
organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD, 1998). The recent
summary report of the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), aptly entitled,
“Literacy in an Information Age” and another publication that included Sample Tasks
from the PISA 200 Assessment highlight the need to revisit the need for lifelong learning
and for critical thinking in light of contemporary circumstances. Literacy in the
Information Age,
the final report from the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), a
large-scale cooperative effort of governments, research institutions, and the Organization
of Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), coordinated by Statistics Canada
and the Educational Testing Service of Princeton, New Jersey, presents evidence that
literacy proficiency affects the quality and flexibility of work, enhanced career
opportunities, higher income and public and civic involvement. Today, adults need to be
able to possess prose, document, and quantitative literacy. The PISA assessment assesses
students’ reading literacy, mathematical literacy, and scientific literacy, which require an
understanding of and facility with the methods and processes pertinent to private use,
public use, work, and education. Both publications discuss the rationale for expanding
literacy to include the dimension of higher-level thinking and the various domains of life
in knowledge-based society.
Globalization and the emergence of the knowledge-based society are two
main features of the economic paradigm at the start of the 21
st
century. The two
processes are taking place simultaneously. Advances in science and technology
have increased the reach and speed of communication and reduced costs. In turn,
the technological advances have contributed to the internationalization of
production and financial markets (OECD, p. 2.
Globalization refers to the growing economic interdependency among
countries and firms through increased trade, foreign investment, international
sourcing of production inputs and inter-firm alliances (OECD, p. 2).
Technological change is playing a vital role in the globalization process.
Through their effects on production methods, consumption patterns and the
structure of economies, information and communication (ITCs) are a key factor
in the transition to the knowledge-based economy (OECD) (p. 3)
The themes highlighted in OECD publications are reiterated by the authors who
contributed to Developing Minds: A Resource Book for Teaching Thinking (Costa, 2001).
Costa reconstructed the lifelong learning vision:
Our world has shifted away from an industrial model of society to a learning
society, from Newtonian to quantum sciences, and from a linear to a complex and


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