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Preparing Future Teachers of Reading: Create a Lasting Literacy by Developing Minds and Bringing Life Into Learning
Unformatted Document Text:  chaotic worldview. These change require education to develop individuals with the knowledge, problem-solving skills, cognitive processes, intellectual dispositions, and habit s of mind necessary to engage in lifelong learning.Students entering the new millennium must come fully equipped with skills that enable them to think fore themselves and be self-initiating, self-modifying, and self-directing. They must acquire the capacity to learn and change continuously and quickly. They will require skills that cannot be gained learning content Rather they must anticipate what might happen and search continuously for more creative solutions. Our society further recognizes a growing need for informed, skilled, and compassionate citizens who have value, truth, openness, creativity, interdependence, balance and love as well as the search for personal and spiritual freedom in all areas of one’s life. This demands that the schools curriculum must be open and flexible enough to accommodate these new perspectives. In reading an article on Standards-based thinking and reasoning skills (Marzano and Pollack, 2001: 29-34), I am struck dumb by information summarized on Figure .3, a modified summary of subject matter emphases on various critical thinking and reasoning skills originally created by Mid-Continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL). Marzano notes that there are few references to thinking, reasoning and decision-making and no references to problem solving, troubleshooting, or argumentation in the NCTE Language Arts Standards. I am distressed to think that the standards were used to identify whether or not interdisciplinary thinking skills do exist and are taught in a subject area, and I am distressed to think that Reading Teacher Educators have not synthesized the research on reading, writing, and thinking better. After searching the 2001 edition of Developing Minds for references to research in Reading and Language Arts and implications for teacher education and teaching, and I find one article, “Developing a Lifetime of Literacy by Rebecca Reagan (332-336). Reagan argues that teachers need to embed the teaching of thinking into literacy instruction and she shares an example of how she does this. The article is a practical application of the work of Robert Swartz and Susan Parks (1994). Infusing the teaching of critical and creative thinking into content area instruction: A lesson design handbook for the elementary grades. Pacific Grove, CA: critical Thinking Press and Software. I am further distressed because I know that a number of researchers and scholars in the field are conducting research related to this agenda. Gordon Wells is an outspoken advocate for this line of thinking. Marie Clay’s research on becoming literate is entirely predicated on the notion that children go through a problem-solving process when becoming literate. Brian Cambourne’s conditions for natural learning highlights the need to model and support thinking throughout the learning process. Kathy Short has focused on the role of inquiry and thinking in learning to read and write critically. Anne Brown and Joseph Campione draw heavily on the research in reading and the language arts when writing about classroom environments that Foster a Learning Culture. Paulo Friere emphasizes the need for problem-posing, dialogue, inquiry, and reflection as foundational to the development of cultural competence. Many literacy researchers and educators who are very concerned about learners and their sense of self-efficacy do research in the field of writing. Donald Graves (1999) author of Bringing Life Into Learning: Creating a lasting Literacy speaks eloquently of the need to teach children to use the language arts for thinking and learning in their

Authors: Rearick, Mary.
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chaotic worldview. These change require education to develop individuals with
the knowledge, problem-solving skills, cognitive processes, intellectual
dispositions, and habit s of mind necessary to engage in lifelong learning.
Students entering the new millennium must come fully equipped with skills that
enable them to think fore themselves and be self-initiating, self-modifying, and
self-directing. They must acquire the capacity to learn and change continuously
and quickly. They will require skills that cannot be gained learning content
Rather they must anticipate what might happen and search continuously for more
creative solutions. Our society further recognizes a growing need for informed,
skilled, and compassionate citizens who have value, truth, openness, creativity,
interdependence, balance and love as well as the search for personal and
spiritual freedom in all areas of one’s life. This demands that the schools
curriculum must be open and flexible enough to accommodate these new
perspectives.
In reading an article on Standards-based thinking and reasoning skills (Marzano
and Pollack, 2001: 29-34), I am struck dumb by information summarized on Figure .3, a
modified summary of subject matter emphases on various critical thinking and reasoning
skills originally created by Mid-Continent Research for Education and Learning
(McREL). Marzano notes that there are few references to thinking, reasoning and
decision-making and no references to problem solving, troubleshooting, or argumentation
in the NCTE Language Arts Standards. I am distressed to think that the standards were
used to identify whether or not interdisciplinary thinking skills do exist and are taught in
a subject area, and I am distressed to think that Reading Teacher Educators have not
synthesized the research on reading, writing, and thinking better. After searching the
2001 edition of Developing Minds for references to research in Reading and Language
Arts and implications for teacher education and teaching, and I find one article,
“Developing a Lifetime of Literacy by Rebecca Reagan (332-336). Reagan argues that
teachers need to embed the teaching of thinking into literacy instruction and she shares an
example of how she does this. The article is a practical application of the work of Robert
Swartz and Susan Parks (1994). Infusing the teaching of critical and creative thinking
into content area instruction: A lesson design handbook for the elementary grades. Pacific
Grove, CA: critical Thinking Press and Software. I am further distressed because I know
that a number of researchers and scholars in the field are conducting research related to
this agenda.
Gordon Wells is an outspoken advocate for this line of thinking. Marie Clay’s
research on becoming literate is entirely predicated on the notion that children go through
a problem-solving process when becoming literate. Brian Cambourne’s conditions for
natural learning highlights the need to model and support thinking throughout the
learning process. Kathy Short has focused on the role of inquiry and thinking in learning
to read and write critically. Anne Brown and Joseph Campione draw heavily on the
research in reading and the language arts when writing about classroom environments
that Foster a Learning Culture. Paulo Friere emphasizes the need for problem-posing,
dialogue, inquiry, and reflection as foundational to the development of cultural
competence.
Many literacy researchers and educators who are very concerned about learners
and their sense of self-efficacy do research in the field of writing. Donald Graves (1999)
author of Bringing Life Into Learning: Creating a lasting Literacy speaks eloquently of
the need to teach children to use the language arts for thinking and learning in their


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