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Using Technology to Design and Deliver Effective and Responsive Instruction in Culturally Diverse Classrooms
Unformatted Document Text:  integrated in schools through the use of computers, CD-ROMS, DVD-ROMS, application software, multimedia applications, electronic books, handheld computers, and communication applications. However, teachers need training, time, administrative and technical support. Because teachers have different views, and attitudes regarding the use of technology, incentives must be given for the use of technology. Through the use of technology, digital portfolios, such as electronic slide shows, multimedia presentations, and hypermedia, students can become more reflective and critical thinkers. Integrating technology into the curriculum requires careful and comprehensive planning. Teachers in schools that are more successful in technology integration, develop Technology Use Plans (TUPs). These technology plans “describe the overall philosophy of technology use and explore how technology will improve teaching and learning” (Baylor and Richie, 2002, p. 396). Cradler (2003) suggests that technology planning requires, establishing a vision for the plan, utilizing and emerging resources, basing technology decisions on curriculum and instructional needs, focusing on student needs, and providing for staff training and follow-up assistance (p. 10). Therefore, by using technology plans, teachers will “ensure that technology strengthens existing curricula and supports meaningful, engaged learning for all students” (Cradler p. l). It can reasonably be argued that “if students are taught the latest technologies as part of their teacher education program, but do not see effective technology practices in the schools, they are unlikely to incorporate technology use in their own teaching” (“National Conference on Teacher Quality, 2003,”¶ 1). Several authors have made the connection between the use of educational technology innovations, teaching and learning with technology, and increases in student learning. Baylor and Richtie (2002) noted that by helping teachers to actively integrate technology into their courses, “investments in time and money will pay off in greater acquisition and higher order thinking skills for students and greater teacher competence and morale” (p. 413). Existing technology standards are challenging teachers to connect curriculum and technology, rather than use technology in isolation. Niess (2001) suggests that technology is an integral component or tool for learning and communications within the context of any academic subject. Teachers are not integrating technology into their classes for a variety of reasons. In order for successful integration to occur, professional staff development, training, and administrative and technical support are needed. Teacher candidates must have appropriate role modes in their higher education courses. Moreover, teachers must plan for effective technology integration. Teachers must be given time to “practice, explore, conceptualize, and collaborate” (“Critical Issue”, 2003, p. 17). The authors therefore recommend that teacher candidates who want to successfully design and deliver effective and responsive instruction in culturally diverse classrooms should: 1. Identify the appropriate instructional skills, strategies, and methods for integrating technology into their instructional practice. 2. Change their perceptions, beliefs, and attitudes based on role change in the technology learning environment from that of a traditional lecturer to a facilitator. 3. Become actively involved in developing a Technology Plan, and implement the components to ensure that technology is integrated into course curricular to ultimately promote teaching and learning, and ensure that students in culturally diverse classrooms are internationally connected and globally 3

Authors: Cornelious, Linda., Yang, Yi. and Alexander, Mary.
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integrated in schools through the use of computers, CD-ROMS, DVD-ROMS,
application software, multimedia applications, electronic books, handheld computers, and
communication applications. However, teachers need training, time, administrative and
technical support. Because teachers have different views, and attitudes regarding the use
of technology, incentives must be given for the use of technology.
Through the use of technology, digital portfolios, such as electronic slide shows,
multimedia presentations, and hypermedia, students can become more reflective and
critical thinkers. Integrating technology into the curriculum requires careful and
comprehensive planning. Teachers in schools that are more successful in technology
integration, develop Technology Use Plans (TUPs). These technology plans “describe
the overall philosophy of technology use and explore how technology will improve
teaching and learning” (Baylor and Richie, 2002, p. 396). Cradler (2003) suggests that
technology planning requires, establishing a vision for the plan, utilizing and emerging
resources, basing technology decisions on curriculum and instructional needs, focusing
on student needs, and providing for staff training and follow-up assistance (p. 10).
Therefore, by using technology plans, teachers will “ensure that technology strengthens
existing curricula and supports meaningful, engaged learning for all students” (Cradler p.
l).
It can reasonably be argued that “if students are taught the latest technologies as part
of their teacher education program, but do not see effective technology practices in the
schools, they are unlikely to incorporate technology use in their own teaching” (“National
Conference on Teacher Quality, 2003,Ӧ 1). Several authors have made the connection
between the use of educational technology innovations, teaching and learning with
technology, and increases in student learning. Baylor and Richtie (2002) noted that by
helping teachers to actively integrate technology into their courses, “investments in time
and money will pay off in greater acquisition and higher order thinking skills for students
and greater teacher competence and morale” (p. 413).
Existing technology standards are challenging teachers to connect curriculum and
technology, rather than use technology in isolation. Niess (2001) suggests that
technology is an integral component or tool for learning and communications within the
context of any academic subject. Teachers are not integrating technology into their
classes for a variety of reasons. In order for successful integration to occur, professional
staff development, training, and administrative and technical support are needed. Teacher
candidates must have appropriate role modes in their higher education courses. Moreover,
teachers must plan for effective technology integration. Teachers must be given time to
“practice, explore, conceptualize, and collaborate” (“Critical Issue”, 2003, p. 17).
The authors therefore recommend that teacher candidates who want to successfully
design and deliver effective and responsive instruction in culturally diverse classrooms
should:
1.
Identify the appropriate instructional skills, strategies, and methods for
integrating technology into their instructional practice.
2.
Change their perceptions, beliefs, and attitudes based on role change in the
technology learning environment from that of a traditional lecturer to a
facilitator.
3.
Become actively involved in developing a Technology Plan, and implement
the components to ensure that technology is integrated into course curricular
to ultimately promote teaching and learning, and ensure that students in
culturally diverse classrooms are internationally connected and globally
3


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