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Teachers Discovering Media Education: Integrating Videos into Social Studies Curriculum
Unformatted Document Text:  Teachers Discovering Media Education: Integrating Videos into Social Studies Curriculum Section I: Content A. Although media production is considered to be a time consuming, difficult, and expensive process, educators need to integrate media literacy and media production into their curriculum in order to prepare new generation for media-rich culture. Rather than just being technical or peripheral, media production must be simple and central to the learning process. This study focuses the participatory research based on an online course called, “Rediscovering History through Media Education.” Teachers redesigned their curriculum integrating new media This study provides a model for teaching and learning through media education. It involves researching online resources, deconstructing curriculum, and creating documentaries and oral history projects. It especially provides research based examples, resources and tools for integrating media production into social studies curriculum. This paper offers creative strategies for producing new media and technologies in social studies curriculum with limited resources and equipment; and showcase participants' multimedia projects. This research promotes literacy through media production in teacher education, describes teacher candidates' reactions, discoveries, and experiences with media, and showcases their multimedia projects. It is based on the participatory research conducted on teaching media production classes and investigated over one hundred educators in seven different states. Media production needs to be integrated into the social studies curriculum. Media Literacy and Media Production are listed under core curriculum content standards in some states such as Massachusetts and others, like New Jersey, have just added Media Literacy into their core curriculum standards. K-12 teachers, now need training in the basic video production techniques and understanding of how to integrate media production throughout the curriculum to enhance learning. B. Robert Kubey and Frank Baker conducted a study 1 on the curricular objectives, educational goals and frameworks developed by each of the 50 states in the US. They discovered that at least 48 state curricular frameworks now contain one or more elements calling for some form of media education, but delivery of media education in the United States still lags behind every other major English-speaking country in the world. According to Kubey & Baker, “the educational establishment is still often mystified about how to retool and retrain to educate future citizens for the new realities of communication.” Although the Kubey-Baker report outlines unmistakable and hopeful signs of development in the area of media education, we actually find that only a few states included media production in their framework. Media Literacy was defined at the Aspen Institute in 1989 as “ability to access, analyze, communicate, and produce media in a variety of forms.” Media literacy is more than asking students to simply decode information that they experience in the media; they must be able to talk back and produce media. As Ernest L. Boyer said: "It is no longer enough simply to read and write. Students must also become literate in the understanding of visual images. Our children must learn how to spot a stereotype, isolate a social cliché, and distinguish facts from propaganda, analysis from banter, and important news from coverage." The role of media production in media education has been an important topic of discussion among educators. With the help of new media and technologies, students will have more access and power to communicate and produce their own projects, presentations, and portfolios and share them with other students around the world. As Renee Hobbs states in her internet article “The Seven Great Debates of Media Literacy Movement,” 2 there is controversy over whether media literacy can be learned solely by deconstructing videos or whether it is necessary for one to learn how to create the videos. Therefore from a deconstructionist perspective, media production is a waste of time in reaching Media Literacy goals. In addition to hardware and software problems and equipment needs, inflexible scheduling in the school create difficulty for media production. “Child-created video is often resisted by teachers. They feel that there is no time for it after all the other demands on the curriculum are met, but a closer look shows that video tape production need not compete with other activities.” 1 The research is at http://www.med.sc.edu:1081/ 2 The article is at http://www.medialit.org/ReadingRoom/keyarticles/sevengreat.htm

Authors: Yildiz, Melda.
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Teachers Discovering Media Education: Integrating Videos into Social Studies Curriculum
Section I: Content
A.
Although media production is considered to be a time consuming, difficult, and expensive process,
educators need to integrate media literacy and media production into their curriculum in order to prepare new
generation for media-rich culture. Rather than just being technical or peripheral, media production must be simple
and central to the learning process.
This study focuses the participatory research based on an online course called, “Rediscovering History
through Media Education.” Teachers redesigned their curriculum integrating new media This study provides a
model for teaching and learning through media education. It involves researching online resources, deconstructing
curriculum, and creating documentaries and oral history projects. It especially provides research based examples,
resources and tools for integrating media production into social studies curriculum. This paper offers creative
strategies for producing new media and technologies in social studies curriculum with limited resources and
equipment; and showcase participants' multimedia projects.
This research promotes literacy through media production in teacher education, describes teacher
candidates' reactions, discoveries, and experiences with media, and showcases their multimedia projects. It is
based on the participatory research conducted on teaching media production classes and investigated over one
hundred educators in seven different states.
Media production needs to be integrated into the social studies curriculum. Media Literacy and Media
Production are listed under core curriculum content standards in some states such as Massachusetts and others,
like New Jersey, have just added Media Literacy into their core curriculum standards. K-12 teachers, now need
training in the basic video production techniques and understanding of how to integrate media production
throughout the curriculum to enhance learning.
B.
Robert Kubey and Frank Baker conducted a study
on the curricular objectives, educational goals and
frameworks developed by each of the 50 states in the US. They discovered that at least 48 state curricular
frameworks now contain one or more elements calling for some form of media education, but delivery of media
education in the United States still lags behind every other major English-speaking country in the world.
According to Kubey & Baker, “the educational establishment is still often mystified about how to retool and
retrain to educate future citizens for the new realities of communication.” Although the Kubey-Baker report
outlines unmistakable and hopeful signs of development in the area of media education, we actually find that only
a few states included media production in their framework.
Media Literacy was defined at the Aspen Institute in 1989 as “ability to access, analyze, communicate,
and produce media in a variety of forms.” Media literacy is more than asking students to simply decode
information that they experience in the media; they must be able to talk back and produce media. As Ernest L.
Boyer said: "It is no longer enough simply to read and write. Students must also become literate in the
understanding of visual images. Our children must learn how to spot a stereotype, isolate a social cliché, and
distinguish facts from propaganda, analysis from banter, and important news from coverage."
The role of media production in media education has been an important topic of discussion among
educators. With the help of new media and technologies, students will have more access and power to
communicate and produce their own projects, presentations, and portfolios and share them with other students
around the world.
As Renee Hobbs states in her internet article “The Seven Great Debates of Media Literacy Movement,”
2
there is controversy over whether media literacy can be learned solely by deconstructing videos or whether it is
necessary for one to learn how to create the videos. Therefore from a deconstructionist perspective, media
production is a waste of time in reaching Media Literacy goals. In addition to hardware and software problems
and equipment needs, inflexible scheduling in the school create difficulty for media production. “Child-created
video is often resisted by teachers. They feel that there is no time for it after all the other demands on the
curriculum are met, but a closer look shows that video tape production need not compete with other activities.”
1
The research is at
2
The article is at


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