All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Partnerships: Conditions for Success
Unformatted Document Text:  AACTE Conference 2006 Partnerships: Conditions for SuccessSection I:A. Statement of the IssuesThe public/private partnerships with public schools are consistent in their aspirations that fruitful and reciprocal opportunities will occur for both institutions. This presentation will focus on the pre-existing conditions and rules of engagement that can ensure effective and mutually beneficial partnership with public schools. The source of this discussion is the partnership between an urban center, a university, and several supporting foundations. The project itself is small. It has one project director and no staff. The resources for the project are nominal—free graduate credit, textbooks, and a small budget to stipend District content specialist. The goals were modest and included: to embed all activities within the construct of the Readers and Writers Workshop and the District’s Curriculum  Frameworks; to provide educators with hands­on experiences resulting in the development of technology­infused language arts curricular units; and to support the development of skills that lead to peer mentoring and coaching. The  evolution of the project was quite a bit more surprising, and this in large part had to due with the conditions that launched the partnership. The two conditions were the close collaboration of technology and content to build the  project’s curriculum, and the requirement that the University partner (the project director) work 50% time within the public school. As a result of these converging forces, the partnership expanded in unexpected yet highly productive  ways. In its first year, the project achieved statistically significant results from the 50 participants in the following areas: comfort in using a computer for personal purposes; comfort in using a computer in the classroom for teaching,  increased use of the computer in support of Readers and Writers Workshop; increased use of computers for assessment; and an increase in providing advice to other teachers. While this is great, what is perhaps more interesting are the administrator responses to the project: “ They were true to the intent to not let this be a tech  piece”; “I think it fits in beautifully in the sense that it was not an initiative that simply had its own agenda. . . That was superb and very unusual”; and “the fact that this project has taken this stance is just tremendous, and it could be a model for anything coming in.”(p. 10)  These indicators reflect the outcomes of Year 1, the project is nearing the end of Year 2, and while the data is still being collected, preliminary indications are that we will exceed the benchmarks achieved in Year 1. Additionally, we have other indicators of success that fall outside the scope of the project such as curriculum from the project has been adopted by the Reading First schools in the district; the use of text­to­speech was launched district­wide as a result of the experiences of first year participants, and partnerships between ELA, OIT, ELL departments are escalating.  B. Literature ReviewThe drawing from the work of Michael Fullan, Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST), and North Central Regional Educational Laboratory (NCREL), it is possible to isolate the conditions necessary for an effective reciprocal partnership between higher education and public schools. Michael Fullan’s launches a model of systems change in education calls for “new horizons or systems level impact” (p. 14, 2003). Through his framework of curriculum, assessment, and teacher learning emerges process oriented capacity building as well as the development of sustained lateral capacity in public school. Leveraging the work of CAST, the introduction of universal design for learning

Authors: Cusack, Sue.
first   previous   Page 1 of 2   next   last



background image
AACTE Conference 2006
Partnerships: Conditions for Success
Section I:
A. Statement of the Issues
The public/private partnerships with public schools are consistent in their aspirations
that fruitful and reciprocal opportunities will occur for both institutions. This presentation
will focus on the pre-existing conditions and rules of engagement that can ensure
effective and mutually beneficial partnership with public schools. The source of this
discussion is the partnership between an urban center, a university, and several
supporting foundations. The project itself is small. It has one project director and no
staff. The resources for the project are nominal—free graduate credit, textbooks, and a
small budget to stipend District content specialist. The goals were modest and included:
to embed all activities within the construct of the Readers and Writers Workshop and the District’s Curriculum 
Frameworks; to provide educators with hands­on experiences resulting in the development of technology­infused 
language arts curricular units; and to support the development of skills that lead to peer mentoring and coaching. The 
evolution of the project was quite a bit more surprising, and this in large part had to due with the conditions that 
launched the partnership. The two conditions were the close collaboration of technology and content to build the 
project’s curriculum, and the requirement that the University partner (the project director) work 50% time within the 
public school. As a result of these converging forces, the partnership expanded in unexpected yet highly productive 
ways. In its first year, the project achieved statistically significant results from the 50 participants in the following 
areas: comfort in using a computer for personal purposes; comfort in using a computer in the classroom for teaching, 
increased use of the computer in support of Readers and Writers Workshop; increased use of computers for 
assessment; and an increase in providing advice to other teachers. While this is great, what is perhaps more 
interesting are the administrator responses to the project: “
They were true to the intent to not let this be a tech 
piece”; “I think it fits in beautifully in the sense that it was not an initiative that simply had its own agenda. . . 
That was superb and very unusual”; and “the fact that this project has taken this stance is just tremendous, 
and it could be a model for anything coming in.”(p. 10) 
These indicators reflect the outcomes of Year 1, the project is nearing the end of Year 2, and while the data 
is still being collected, preliminary indications are that we will exceed the benchmarks achieved in Year 1. 
Additionally, we have other indicators of success that fall outside the scope of the project such as 
curriculum from the project has been adopted by the Reading First schools in the district; the use of text­to­
speech was launched district­wide as a result of the experiences of first year participants, and partnerships 
between ELA, OIT, ELL departments are escalating. 
B. Literature Review
The drawing from the work of Michael Fullan, Center for Applied Special Technology
(CAST), and North Central Regional Educational Laboratory (NCREL), it is possible to
isolate the conditions necessary for an effective reciprocal partnership between higher
education and public schools. Michael Fullan’s launches a model of systems change in
education calls for “new horizons or systems level impact” (p. 14, 2003). Through his
framework of curriculum, assessment, and teacher learning emerges process oriented
capacity building as well as the development of sustained lateral capacity in public
school. Leveraging the work of CAST, the introduction of universal design for learning


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 1 of 2   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.