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Protest and Profits: A Sectoral Analysis of Social Movement Impact on Business Support for Liberal Rights and the Rule of Law

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Abstract:

In the paper, I consider the responses of southern business interests to the demands of the American civil rights movement. Among numerous studies of the movement’s success, it is often asserted that “business interests” supported making concessions as the escalation of disruptive protests drove down profits. However, I argue that this commonplace assertion elides the diversity among southern business interests. Whereas some were vulnerable to civil rights disruptions, others were not. I present a sectoral analysis in which the responsiveness of economic actors to movement demands varies according to their exposure to the costs of local disruptions and to conceding to movement demands. This analysis has several implications. First, it clarifies the distinctive patterns of southern business responses and the eventual local successes of the civil rights movement. Second, this investigation advances more general studies of social movement success. Finally, this account of business involvement in the democratization of southern politics has comparative implications for studies of political transitions elsewhere.

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movement (205), econom (147), cost (135), interest (108), local (95), actor (95), right (83), new (78), civil (76), disrupt (75), concess (74), polit (73), busi (67), demand (55), white (51), protest (48), public (46), press (46), univers (45), support (43), upon (43),

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democratic, transition, business, civil rights
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Name: American Political Science Association
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MLA Citation:

Luders, Joseph. "Protest and Profits: A Sectoral Analysis of Social Movement Impact on Business Support for Liberal Rights and the Rule of Law" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2013-12-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p41814_index.html>

APA Citation:

Luders, J. E. , 2005-09-01 "Protest and Profits: A Sectoral Analysis of Social Movement Impact on Business Support for Liberal Rights and the Rule of Law" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC Online <PDF>. 2013-12-17 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p41814_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the paper, I consider the responses of southern business interests to the demands of the American civil rights movement. Among numerous studies of the movement’s success, it is often asserted that “business interests” supported making concessions as the escalation of disruptive protests drove down profits. However, I argue that this commonplace assertion elides the diversity among southern business interests. Whereas some were vulnerable to civil rights disruptions, others were not. I present a sectoral analysis in which the responsiveness of economic actors to movement demands varies according to their exposure to the costs of local disruptions and to conceding to movement demands. This analysis has several implications. First, it clarifies the distinctive patterns of southern business responses and the eventual local successes of the civil rights movement. Second, this investigation advances more general studies of social movement success. Finally, this account of business involvement in the democratization of southern politics has comparative implications for studies of political transitions elsewhere.

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Document Type: PDF
Page count: 55
Word count: 15869
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Protest and Profits: A Sectoral Analysis of Social Movement Impact on Business Support for Liberal Rights and the Rule of Law Comments welcome. Joseph E. Luders Department of Political Science Stern College for Women – Yeshiva University 245 Lexington Avenue New York NY 10016 luders@yu.edu Prepared for delivery at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association September 1-4 2005 Washington D.C. An earlier version of this paper was presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political
for Studies of Social Change Working Paper Series No. 162 (June 1993). Vander Zanden James W. 1965. Race Relations in Transition. New York: Random House. Williams Juan. 1987. Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Years 1954-1965. New York: Viking. Wilson James Q. 1973. Political Organizations. New York: Basic Books. Wilson James Q. 1961. "The Strategy of Protest: Problems of Negro Civic Action." Journal of Conflict Resolution 3: 291-303. Wright Gavin. 1991. “Economic Aspects of the Civil Rights Movement


Similar Titles:
Social Movements and Political Success: Civil Rights Outcomes in Public School Desegregation and Voting Rights

The Legitimacy of Protest: White Southerners’ Attitudes Toward the Civil Rights Movement

The Economics of Movement Success:Business Responses to Civil Rights Mobilization


 
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