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To Learn or Not to Learn, That IS the Question: Teaching and Outcome Assessments in Political Science Using Problem Based Critical Incident Technique

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Abstract:

The problem-based critical incident technique, pioneered by Dr. John Flanagan, an industrial psychologist has been used since the early 1940s in a wide variety of situations. Typically, interviews or small groups were used to collect data, although more recently, the technique has been applied to classroom groups and small seminars in the form of writing exercises and debriefing sessions. Respondents are asked to provide possible solutions to posed events or problems and to provide feedback about their understanding of the class content, problem or event, text reading, or occupational experiences. Analysis and assessment of responses has helped to uncover the dynamics influencing successful performance, and can be used as direct evidence of what students are learning. Furthermore, this technique has the potential to be especially helpful in developing guidelines for learning outcomes and academic excellence. This study has developed three critical incidents that can be used in the political science classroom as a means to evaluate student learning (outcome assessments) as both direct evidence and indirect evidence. These assessments address issues of learning outcome in diverse classrooms with a focus upon inequity and diverse learning styles. These instruments can be used across the global sphere in on-line educational courses to gap the divide that a virtual classroom brings to the educational experience.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

student (139), learn (110), problem (83), assess (62), knowledg (47), base (44), paper (44), polit (43), use (43), develop (41), educ (38), critic (35), work (34), group (33), activ (33), charlen (30), includ (29), scienc (27), cours (25), one (24), skill (24),

Author's Keywords:

Constructivism, Undergraduate education, PBL, Assessment Rubrics
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Association:
Name: American Political Science Association
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MLA Citation:

Harkness, S.. "To Learn or Not to Learn, That IS the Question: Teaching and Outcome Assessments in Political Science Using Problem Based Critical Incident Technique" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Sep 02, 2004 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p59507_index.html>

APA Citation:

Harkness, S. , 2004-09-02 "To Learn or Not to Learn, That IS the Question: Teaching and Outcome Assessments in Political Science Using Problem Based Critical Incident Technique" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p59507_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The problem-based critical incident technique, pioneered by Dr. John Flanagan, an industrial psychologist has been used since the early 1940s in a wide variety of situations. Typically, interviews or small groups were used to collect data, although more recently, the technique has been applied to classroom groups and small seminars in the form of writing exercises and debriefing sessions. Respondents are asked to provide possible solutions to posed events or problems and to provide feedback about their understanding of the class content, problem or event, text reading, or occupational experiences. Analysis and assessment of responses has helped to uncover the dynamics influencing successful performance, and can be used as direct evidence of what students are learning. Furthermore, this technique has the potential to be especially helpful in developing guidelines for learning outcomes and academic excellence. This study has developed three critical incidents that can be used in the political science classroom as a means to evaluate student learning (outcome assessments) as both direct evidence and indirect evidence. These assessments address issues of learning outcome in diverse classrooms with a focus upon inequity and diverse learning styles. These instruments can be used across the global sphere in on-line educational courses to gap the divide that a virtual classroom brings to the educational experience.

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Abstract Only All Academic Inc.
Associated Document Available American Political Science Association
Associated Document Available Political Research Online

Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 27
Word count: 8042
Text sample:
To Learn or Not to Learn That IS the Question: Teaching and Outcome Assessments in Political Science Using Problem Based Critical Incident Technique Prepared for delivery at the 2004 Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association September 2 - September 5 2004. Copyright by the American Political Science Association. S. Suzan J. Harkness PhD Assistant Professor Political Science The University of the District of Columbia 4200 Connecticut Avenue N.W. Building 41 Room 400-05 Washington D.C. 20008 sharkness@udc.edu 202-274-5657
Noam. 2004. "What Makes Classroom Learning a Worthwhile Experience?" Thought and Action XIX(2): 23-35. von Glasersfeld E. 1989. "Cognition Construction of Knowledge and Teaching " Synthese 80(1): 121-140. von Glasersfeld E. 1996.Introduction: Aspects of constructivism. In C. Fosnot (Ed.) Constructivism: Theory perspectives and practice (pp.3-7). New York: Teachers College Press. von Glasersfeld E. 1984 'An introduction to radical constructivism'. In P. Watzlawick (ed.) The invented reality. London: W. W. Naughton & Co. Walvoord B. E. and V.J. Anderson. 1998.


Similar Titles:
Problem-Based Learning in a Political Science Classroom: Perspectives of a Professor and anUndergraduate Student

To Learn or Not to Learn, That IS the Question: Assessment in Problem Based Critical Incident Learning


 
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