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Federalism and the Separation of Powers at the Subnational Level

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Abstract:

Most of the literature on federalism has emphasized the relationship between national and subnational governments, but has overlooked the organization of power at the subnational level. Likewise, most of the debate on the separation of powers in presidential, parliamentary, and mixed systems has neglected the role of federalism in bolstering the separation of powers. In this paper, we argue federalism may be defined as a constitutional arrangement that creates executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government at the subnational level. This definition has important implications for the literatures on federalism and the separation of powers, two themes often treated in isolation. First, it directs the attention of students of federalism to the neglected subject of the separation of powers at the subnational level. Second, it directs the attention of students of the separation of powers to the issue of federalism. We show that the existence of institutional mechanisms that override the subnational separation of powers in federal systems is problematic for democracy and deserves further attention. We also point to the fact that by safeguarding the subnational separation of powers, federalism can strengthen democracy.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

feder (247), power (184), constitut (148), separ (137), govern (133), subnat (115), state (93), level (92), system (85), court (84), legislatur (64), nation (63), execut (62), law (58), presidenti (52), polit (47), rule (42), legisl (41), parliamentari (39), branch (33), definit (32),

Author's Keywords:

Separation of Powers, Presidentialism, Parliamentarism, Federalism, subnational legislatures, subnational courts, Argentina, Venezuela, Mexico, Brazil
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Name: American Political Science Association
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MLA Citation:

Cameron, Maxwell. and Falleti, Tulia. "Federalism and the Separation of Powers at the Subnational Level" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Sep 02, 2004 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p59581_index.html>

APA Citation:

Cameron, M. and Falleti, T. G. , 2004-09-02 "Federalism and the Separation of Powers at the Subnational Level" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p59581_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Most of the literature on federalism has emphasized the relationship between national and subnational governments, but has overlooked the organization of power at the subnational level. Likewise, most of the debate on the separation of powers in presidential, parliamentary, and mixed systems has neglected the role of federalism in bolstering the separation of powers. In this paper, we argue federalism may be defined as a constitutional arrangement that creates executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government at the subnational level. This definition has important implications for the literatures on federalism and the separation of powers, two themes often treated in isolation. First, it directs the attention of students of federalism to the neglected subject of the separation of powers at the subnational level. Second, it directs the attention of students of the separation of powers to the issue of federalism. We show that the existence of institutional mechanisms that override the subnational separation of powers in federal systems is problematic for democracy and deserves further attention. We also point to the fact that by safeguarding the subnational separation of powers, federalism can strengthen democracy.

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Document Type: .pdf
Page count: 46
Word count: 12150
Text sample:
FEDERALISM AND THE SEPARATION OF POWERS AT THE SUBNATIONAL LEVEL Maxwell A. Cameron Professor Department of Political Science C472-1866 Main Mall University of British Columbia Vancouver BC Canada V6T 1Z1 Phone: (604) 822-6606 Fax: (604) 822-5540 maxcamer@interchange.ubc.ca Tulia G. Falleti Assistant Professor Department of Political Science University of Pennsylvania 208 S. 37th Street Philadelphia PA USA 19104-6215 Phone: (215) 898-4240 Fax: (215) 573-2073 falleti@sas.upenn.edu August 2004 (Draft. Comments are welcome. Please do not cite without authors' permission) Prepared for
the government of Mexico City and those with opposition governors and simple majorities in the state legislatures were: Baja California Jalisco and Nuevo León. Alonso Lujambio El Poder Compartido. Un Ensayo Sobre La Democratización Mexicana 66 [Shared Power. An Essay on Mexico's Democratization] (Mexico: Editorial Oceano de Mexico 2000). 67 Jonathan Fox "The Difficult Transition from Clientelism to Citizenship: Lessons from Mexico " World Politics 46 (January 1994) pp. 151-184. 68 Hannah Arendt On Revolution (New York: Viking Press


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