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Vote by Mail: Voter Preferences and Self-Reported Voting Behavior

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Abstract:

This research note utilizes probit analysis to assess recent opinion on vote by mail and to estimate the effect of vote by mail on the turnout of various demographic and partisan groups within the State of Oregon – a state that adopted vote by mail for all of its election beginning in 1999. The results show that Oregonians have maintained their overwhelming support for vote by mail elections -- in particular, women, Independents, Republicans, and older voters. Self-reported responses regarding frequency of voting indicate that women and the employed are most likely to indicate that they have voted more often since the adoption of vote by mail and that this increased turnout does not favor a particular party’s candidates.

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vote (96), mail (69), elect (37), oregon (27), variabl (23), voter (21), prefer (21), survey (16), state (15), 1 (14), particip (13), elector (12), analysi (12), sinc (12), often (11), turnout (11), place (10), indic (10), 2 (10), poll (9), research (9),
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MLA Citation:

Southwell, Priscilla. "Vote by Mail: Voter Preferences and Self-Reported Voting Behavior" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Sep 02, 2004 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p60739_index.html>

APA Citation:

Southwell, P. , 2004-09-02 "Vote by Mail: Voter Preferences and Self-Reported Voting Behavior" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p60739_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research note utilizes probit analysis to assess recent opinion on vote by mail and to estimate the effect of vote by mail on the turnout of various demographic and partisan groups within the State of Oregon – a state that adopted vote by mail for all of its election beginning in 1999. The results show that Oregonians have maintained their overwhelming support for vote by mail elections -- in particular, women, Independents, Republicans, and older voters. Self-reported responses regarding frequency of voting indicate that women and the employed are most likely to indicate that they have voted more often since the adoption of vote by mail and that this increased turnout does not favor a particular party’s candidates.

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Associated Document Available American Political Science Association
Associated Document Available Political Research Online

Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 14
Word count: 2455
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Vote by Mail: Voter Preferences and Self-Reported Voting Behavior Priscilla L. Southwell Professor Department of Political Science University of Oregon Eugene OR 97403 (541) 346-3277 psouth@oregon.uoregon.edu Prepared for delivery at the 2004 Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association September 2 - September 5 2004. Copyright by the American Political Science Association. Please do not quote or cite without permission from the author. Vote by Mail: Voter Preferences and Self-Reported Voting Behavior Abstract This research note utilizes probit
22: 223-239. Oregon Annual Social Indicators Survey. (2003). Oregon Survey Research Laboratory University of Oregon.. Southwell Priscilla L. and Justin Burchett. (1997) "Survey of Vote-by-Mail Senate Election in the State of Oregon " PS: Political Science and Politics 91: 53-57. Southwell Priscilla L. and Justin Burchett. (2000) "Does Changing the Rules Change the Players? Vote-by-Mail and the Composition of the Electorate " Social Science Quarterly 81: 837-845. Traugott Michael. W. (1996). Report on the Characteristics of the Oregon Electorate


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