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(Un)Intended Impacts: A Case Study on the Human Impact of Globalization
Unformatted Document Text:  Kenneth Michael Panfilio—14 became a pivotal line of argumentation as the Bolivian government identified water privatization protestors as enemies of the state. Second, global arrogance uses the myth of familiarity, or “hegemonic claims about what is best for the world.” 34 Under this rubric, global arrogance works to construct social problems in terms that foreclose any meaningful debate on possible solutions, while legitimizing the hegemon as the natural agent for enacting change. Such a strategy “keeps the focus of attention where the regime wants it—not elsewhere on perhaps more pressing and fundamental concerns.” 35 Again, this myth finds itself being used in our earlier focus on Bolivia as both state and transnational corporation is presented as the expert whose actions are a priori constituted as best for the well being of the people. Third, the myth of inclusiveness “has as its centerpiece, the promotion of democracy.” 36 The problem, however, is how democracy is promoted. When this complicated concept is simply reduced to mean promoting free elections, then the power of democratization loses powerful ground as a possible force for facilitating important dialogues about the types of social, economic, and political transformations needed for a free society. In the case of Bolivia, the issue of water privatization is seen simply as an extension of free trade whose semantic value inappropriately conflates the liberalization of markets with the idea of democracy. Fourth, the myth of sacrifice “is about the role of the United States, like the Lone Ranger, coming to the rescue of those at risk around the world.” 37 Adopting the role of global police force, the United States is able to claim its international aid and military support as constant sacrifices for global peace. While not specifically applicable to the water privatization example, 34 Leatherman, “Global Arrogance,” 11. 35 Leatherman, “Global Arrogance,” 12. 36 Leatherman, “Global Arrogance,” 14. 37 Leatherman, “Global Arrogance,” 16.

Authors: Panfilio, Kenneth.
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Kenneth Michael Panfilio—14
became a pivotal line of argumentation as the Bolivian government identified water privatization
protestors as enemies of the state.
Second, global arrogance uses the myth of familiarity, or “hegemonic claims about what
is best for the world.”
34
Under this rubric, global arrogance works to construct social problems
in terms that foreclose any meaningful debate on possible solutions, while legitimizing the
hegemon as the natural agent for enacting change. Such a strategy “keeps the focus of attention
where the regime wants it—not elsewhere on perhaps more pressing and fundamental
concerns.”
35
Again, this myth finds itself being used in our earlier focus on Bolivia as both state
and transnational corporation is presented as the expert whose actions are a priori constituted as
best for the well being of the people.
Third,
the myth of inclusiveness “has as its centerpiece, the promotion of democracy.”
36
The problem, however, is how democracy is promoted. When this complicated concept is
simply reduced to mean promoting free elections, then the power of democratization loses
powerful ground as a possible force for facilitating important dialogues about the types of social,
economic, and political transformations needed for a free society. In the case of Bolivia, the
issue of water privatization is seen simply as an extension of free trade whose semantic value
inappropriately conflates the liberalization of markets with the idea of democracy.
Fourth,
the myth of sacrifice “is about the role of the United States, like the Lone Ranger,
coming to the rescue of those at risk around the world.”
37
Adopting the role of global police
force, the United States is able to claim its international aid and military support as constant
sacrifices for global peace. While not specifically applicable to the water privatization example,
34
Leatherman, “Global Arrogance,” 11.
35
Leatherman, “Global Arrogance,” 12.
36
Leatherman, “Global Arrogance,” 14.
37
Leatherman, “Global Arrogance,” 16.


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