Citation

A Democratic Ethics of International Advocacy

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Get this Document | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

Which NGOs are preferable, given democratic commitments? How should democrats identify NGOs that need to be censured or constrained? Can (or should) NGOs be held democratically accountable? To answer these questions, I draw on both contemporary democratic theory and empirical research on NGOs. The main purpose of this paper is to argue the need to evaluate at least some NGOs using democratic ideals. To date, there is little, if any, discussion of how democratic ideals apply to NGOs. My paper aims to draw attention to this neglected issue.
In particular, I propose that contemporary political theorists and democratic citizens should be in the business of evaluating NGOs using democratic ideals-where these ideals are understood as non-procedural and substantive. My proposal is contentious. There are two main objections to my proposal that I derive from contemporary political theory. The first denies that democratic virtues should apply to international organizations. According to this objection, the proper scope of democratic principles is the state--specifically, to the formal governmental processes and procedures of that bestow popular control to citizens. A second objection maintains that political theorists and democratic citizens should not evaluate NGOs with respect to how well they embody democratic norms in their internal operations or with respect to their specific aims. I then identify four reasons why some NGOs should be evaluated by democratic ideals. Drawing on my discussion of these reasons, I argue that NGOs need to respect democratically elected governments. However, the need to respect democratically elected governments is not necessarily overriding. Democratic NGOs need to balance at least three commitments: 1) a commitment to the liberal democracies that fund and sponsor them, 2) a commitment to beneficiaries (those being helped by their programs) and 3) a commitment to those democratic governments in countries where their projects are located. The way NGOs go about weighing these three commitments should not be evaluated simply by standards of formal democratic procedures to which they may be subject but also by substantive democratic norms.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

democrat (176), ngos (162), democraci (58), state (43), organ (40), norm (36), commit (35), intern (33), polit (32), valu (29), ngo (28), account (28), institut (27), argu (27), evalu (26), way (26), one (26), govern (26), legitimaci (24), particip (23), reason (23),

Author's Keywords:

Keywords: Nongovernmental Organizations, accountability, democratic theory, Dahl, Rosenblum, participation, human rights, NGO,
Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: American Political Science Association
URL:
http://www.apsanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p65060_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Dovi, Suzanne. "A Democratic Ethics of International Advocacy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2009-05-27 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p65060_index.html>

APA Citation:

Dovi, S. , 2002-08-28 "A Democratic Ethics of International Advocacy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-27 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p65060_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Which NGOs are preferable, given democratic commitments? How should democrats identify NGOs that need to be censured or constrained? Can (or should) NGOs be held democratically accountable? To answer these questions, I draw on both contemporary democratic theory and empirical research on NGOs. The main purpose of this paper is to argue the need to evaluate at least some NGOs using democratic ideals. To date, there is little, if any, discussion of how democratic ideals apply to NGOs. My paper aims to draw attention to this neglected issue.
In particular, I propose that contemporary political theorists and democratic citizens should be in the business of evaluating NGOs using democratic ideals-where these ideals are understood as non-procedural and substantive. My proposal is contentious. There are two main objections to my proposal that I derive from contemporary political theory. The first denies that democratic virtues should apply to international organizations. According to this objection, the proper scope of democratic principles is the state--specifically, to the formal governmental processes and procedures of that bestow popular control to citizens. A second objection maintains that political theorists and democratic citizens should not evaluate NGOs with respect to how well they embody democratic norms in their internal operations or with respect to their specific aims. I then identify four reasons why some NGOs should be evaluated by democratic ideals. Drawing on my discussion of these reasons, I argue that NGOs need to respect democratically elected governments. However, the need to respect democratically elected governments is not necessarily overriding. Democratic NGOs need to balance at least three commitments: 1) a commitment to the liberal democracies that fund and sponsor them, 2) a commitment to beneficiaries (those being helped by their programs) and 3) a commitment to those democratic governments in countries where their projects are located. The way NGOs go about weighing these three commitments should not be evaluated simply by standards of formal democratic procedures to which they may be subject but also by substantive democratic norms.

Get this Document:

Find this citation or document at one or all of these locations below. The links below may have the citation or the entire document for free or you may purchase access to the document. Clicking on these links will change the site you're on and empty your shopping cart.

Abstract Only All Academic Inc.
Associated Document Available American Political Science Association
Associated Document Available Political Research Online

Document Type: .pdf
Page count: 24
Word count: 7286
Text sample:
1 A Democratic Ethics of International Advocacy International and domestic Non­Governmental Organizations (NGOs) 1 are widely recognized as important political actors in developing countries (e.g. Keck and Sikkink 1998; Edwards and Hulme 1996). These organizations perform a number of tasks ranging from reporting human right abuses providing economic and political support to domestic social movements and providing vital services to the poor and marginalized groups in developing countries e.g. refugees and women. By all accounts the number of these
in China.'' Australian Journal of Political Science (July) 225­39. Slim Hugo. 2002 ``By What Authority? The Legitimacy and Accountability of Non­ governmental Organisations'' Journal of Humanitarian Assistance. at http://www.jha.ac/articles/a082htm Smith Steven and Michael Lipsky. 1993. Non­Profits for Hire: The Welfare State in Age of Contracting. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press. Uvin Peter and David Miller ``Scaling Up:Thinking Through the issues. The World Hunger Program 1994. at http://www.globalpolicy.org/ngos/role/intro/imp/2000/1204.htm Van Tuijl Peter. 1999. ``NGO and Human Rights: Sources of Justice and


Similar Titles:
State Participation in International Institutions I: State Support to Human Rights Norms

Democratic Norms, Evaluations of Institutions, and Modes of Political Participation in Latin America: Who Becomes Protesters, Community Activists, and Campaigners?


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.