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Eisenhower's Veto Threats: Full of Nothing, Signifying Sound and Fury

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Abstract:

The veto is one of the few formal powers accorded to the President of the United States, yet it plays a central role in many theories of the executive branch and in theories of congressional action as well. To be more precise, the threat of a future veto is generally held to be the important component. However, there have been few empirical or theoretical studies of veto threats. This paper presents new systematic data on the veto 'threats' of President Dwight Eisenhower. These data are analyzed to test novel theories regarding the relation of future veto threats to the outcomes of past veto threats. Specifically, this theory extends concepts of 'credibility' of threat to include information that is specific to both the president in question and that president's then-current history of congressional interactions. Some support is found for the notion that a president who "cries wolf" and fails to carry out threats will find Congress less responsive to future threats.
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Most Common Document Word Stems:

veto (255), threat (206), bill (170), congress (134), presid (128), eisenhow (110), yes (105), data (61), threaten (58), time (52), one (52), use (42), 1 (42), model (40), issu (40), h.r (39), new (34), legisl (34), would (32), number (31), first (30),

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Keywords: veto, veto threat, Eisenhower, vetoes
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Name: American Political Science Association
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MLA Citation:

Jarvis, Matthew. "Eisenhower's Veto Threats: Full of Nothing, Signifying Sound and Fury" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p65812_index.html>

APA Citation:

Jarvis, M. , 2002-08-28 "Eisenhower's Veto Threats: Full of Nothing, Signifying Sound and Fury" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p65812_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The veto is one of the few formal powers accorded to the President of the United States, yet it plays a central role in many theories of the executive branch and in theories of congressional action as well. To be more precise, the threat of a future veto is generally held to be the important component. However, there have been few empirical or theoretical studies of veto threats. This paper presents new systematic data on the veto 'threats' of President Dwight Eisenhower. These data are analyzed to test novel theories regarding the relation of future veto threats to the outcomes of past veto threats. Specifically, this theory extends concepts of 'credibility' of threat to include information that is specific to both the president in question and that president's then-current history of congressional interactions. Some support is found for the notion that a president who "cries wolf" and fails to carry out threats will find Congress less responsive to future threats.
Check author's web site for an updated version of the paper.

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Document Type: .pdf
Page count: 42
Word count: 11714
Text sample:
Eisenhower's Veto Threats: Full of Nothing Signifying Sound and Fury Matthew Jarvis mjarvis@socrates.berkeley.edu Department of Political Science University of California Berkeley Abstract The veto is one of the few formal powers accorded to the President of the United States yet it plays a central role in many theories of the executive branch and in theories of congressional action as well. To be more precise the threat of a future veto is generally held to be the important component. However
10128 1960 Yes Yes No No No Veteran's housing H.R. 7903 1960 No No No Yes No Water pollution H.R. 3610 1960 Yes No No No Yes Wheat S 2759/H.R. 12261 1960 Yes Yes No No No Zinc/lead H.R. 8860 1960 Yes No No No Yes


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