Citation

Can Our Dreams Get Along?: Race and Competing Beliefs in the American Dream

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Get this Document | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

Faith in a person?s prospects for economic success in the United States, also known as belief in the American Dream, will be evaluated in this paper through the prism of theories on race and political attitudes drawn from social psychology, sociology and political science. Our source of data is a unique survey that oversampled Asians, African Americans and Latinos and extensively evaluated respondent?s attitudes about the American Dream. Our preliminary findings confirm previous, and counterintuitive, results, first noted by Hochschild, that middle class African Americans are less likely to believe in the American Dream than lower class African Americans. We have also found that whites are more willing than previously thought to accept that discrimination may interfere with the ability of people of color to achieve the American Dream, although changes in survey question wording appear to significantly influence whites? responses to questions about the effects of discrimination.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

american (9), dream (6), ursinus (5), polit (5), colleg (5), paper (4), african (3), winslow (3), samuel (3), jr (3), w (3), class (2), swinslow@ursinus.edu (2), evalu (2), white (2), belief (2), depart (2), scienc (2), survey (2), attitud (2), 19426 (2),

Author's Keywords:

Keywords: Race, American Dream, African Americans, Asians, Latinos, Whites, People of Color
Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: American Political Science Association
URL:
http://www.apsanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p66432_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Winslow, Samuel., King, Leilani. and Newsome, Stacey. "Can Our Dreams Get Along?: Race and Competing Beliefs in the American Dream" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p66432_index.html>

APA Citation:

Winslow, S. W., King, L. and Newsome, S. , 2002-08-28 "Can Our Dreams Get Along?: Race and Competing Beliefs in the American Dream" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p66432_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Faith in a person?s prospects for economic success in the United States, also known as belief in the American Dream, will be evaluated in this paper through the prism of theories on race and political attitudes drawn from social psychology, sociology and political science. Our source of data is a unique survey that oversampled Asians, African Americans and Latinos and extensively evaluated respondent?s attitudes about the American Dream. Our preliminary findings confirm previous, and counterintuitive, results, first noted by Hochschild, that middle class African Americans are less likely to believe in the American Dream than lower class African Americans. We have also found that whites are more willing than previously thought to accept that discrimination may interfere with the ability of people of color to achieve the American Dream, although changes in survey question wording appear to significantly influence whites? responses to questions about the effects of discrimination.

Get this Document:

Find this citation or document at one or all of these locations below. The links below may have the citation or the entire document for free or you may purchase access to the document. Clicking on these links will change the site you're on and empty your shopping cart.

Abstract Only All Academic Inc.
Associated Document Available American Political Science Association
Associated Document Available Political Research Online

Document Type: .pdf
Page count: 2
Word count: 237
Text sample:
Can Our Dreams Get Along?: Race and Competing Beliefs in the American Dream Samuel W. Winslow Jr. Ursinus College Leilani King Ursinus College Stacey Newsome Ursinus College For a copy of this paper contact: Samuel W. Winslow Jr. Ursinus College Politics Department Collegeville PA 19426 Email: swinslow@ursinus.edu Paper prepared for presentation at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association August 29­September 1 2002 in Boston Massachusetts Abstract Faith in a person's prospects for economic success in the
and Latinos and extensively evaluated respondent's attitudes about the American Dream. Our preliminary findings confirm previous and counterintuitive results first noted by Hochschild that middle class African Americans are less likely to believe in the American Dream than lower class African Americans. We have also found that whites are more willing than previously thought to accept that discrimination may interfere with the ability of people of color to achieve the American Dream although changes in survey question wording appear


Similar Titles:
“Racial Identity and Body Image Among African-American female college students attending predominately white colleges.”

Fear and Loathing in College Classrooms: A Survey of Political Science Department Chairs Regarding Political Bias

Reforming the Structure of the Political Science Curriculum: A Survey of Liberal Arts and Sciences Colleges and Universities


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.