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What Space for Europe? The Role of the EU CFSP in National Foreign Policy: The Case of Germany

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Abstract:

This paper employs the concept of Europeanization to analyze the interaction between the national and the European levels in foreign policy-making by focussing on the case of German foreign policy, particularly towards the crisis in Macedonia in 2001. In addition to elucidating the national-European nexus with regard to foreign security policy, this paper also aims to answer the following question: what role does Europe and the European integration project play in national foreign policy considerations? This paper conceptualises Europeanization as three separate but interlocking processes: that of national adaptation (a top-down process), national projection (a bottom-up process) and that of identity formation where European integration and foreign policy identities become ingrained in national decision-making. Europeanization as an analytical concept has gained currency in the study of EU foreign policy in the past few years, but existing studies have not focused on the foreign policies of the big member states. The case of Germany is chosen because despite its multilateral foreign policy profile, the end of the Cold War and unification have raised questions about the country's foreign policy orientation and a potential move towards a more national interest-based foreign policy. Domestically, debates surrounding the use of force and German military deployment in the war in Kosovo as well as the debate about German 'normalisation' also indicated a potential shift away from multilateralism. This paper argues, however, that German foreign policy exhibits a considerable degree of continuity rather than change. In the case of Macedonia, German foreign policy was subject to considerable adaptation pressures to contribute to NATO Operation Essential Harvest in order to retain credibility for Germany (as well as for Europe) even if the possibility for future policy projection was explicitly recognised. In terms of interests and identity, European and German national interests and preferences continued to be frequently equated in national foreign policy discourse.
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Name: International Studies Association
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http://www.isanet.org


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MLA Citation:

Gross, Eva. "What Space for Europe? The Role of the EU CFSP in National Foreign Policy: The Case of Germany" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p69826_index.html>

APA Citation:

Gross, E. M. , 2005-03-05 "What Space for Europe? The Role of the EU CFSP in National Foreign Policy: The Case of Germany" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p69826_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper employs the concept of Europeanization to analyze the interaction between the national and the European levels in foreign policy-making by focussing on the case of German foreign policy, particularly towards the crisis in Macedonia in 2001. In addition to elucidating the national-European nexus with regard to foreign security policy, this paper also aims to answer the following question: what role does Europe and the European integration project play in national foreign policy considerations? This paper conceptualises Europeanization as three separate but interlocking processes: that of national adaptation (a top-down process), national projection (a bottom-up process) and that of identity formation where European integration and foreign policy identities become ingrained in national decision-making. Europeanization as an analytical concept has gained currency in the study of EU foreign policy in the past few years, but existing studies have not focused on the foreign policies of the big member states. The case of Germany is chosen because despite its multilateral foreign policy profile, the end of the Cold War and unification have raised questions about the country's foreign policy orientation and a potential move towards a more national interest-based foreign policy. Domestically, debates surrounding the use of force and German military deployment in the war in Kosovo as well as the debate about German 'normalisation' also indicated a potential shift away from multilateralism. This paper argues, however, that German foreign policy exhibits a considerable degree of continuity rather than change. In the case of Macedonia, German foreign policy was subject to considerable adaptation pressures to contribute to NATO Operation Essential Harvest in order to retain credibility for Germany (as well as for Europe) even if the possibility for future policy projection was explicitly recognised. In terms of interests and identity, European and German national interests and preferences continued to be frequently equated in national foreign policy discourse.

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